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UK Citizen has questions reg Naturalization

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Hi all,

these past few days I ve been tossing around the idea of becoming a US Citizen through naturalization (mu husband is American). This was never my plan but we ve had a baby a few months ago and I would just feel better having a US Citizenship.

My whole citizenship situation is frustrating and messy so I m not sure if things work out the way I would like to.

I m a British Citizen born (which makes me a British citizen by descent), raised and lived in Germany my whole life until 2012. Thats the year we moved.

I would like to apply for US citizenship but don't want to give up my British one. Do I even stand a chance of keeping it? Also, in order to keep it do I need to apply to some sort of Retention Certificate or can I just go ahead and apply for US citizenship?

How does the whole process for UK citizens work?

Any help would be appreciated!

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You can apply for US citizenship without compromising your British citizenship.

The only way to renounce your British citizenship would be by completing an application of renunciation and filing it. Nothing you file with the US government - including a US citizenship application - will revoke your British citizenship.

In short, this is a non-issue.


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To clarify- are you currently living in the USA and have a valid greencard?


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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You can apply for US citizenship without compromising your British citizenship.

The only way to renounce your British citizenship would be by completing an application of renunciation and filing it. Nothing you file with the US government - including a US citizenship application - will revoke your British citizenship.

In short, this is a non-issue.

Seconded.

Dual citizenship with Germany, if the OP has that as well, is difficult, but not at all difficult for British.

I already have British and Canadian, as do my parents; we naturalized to Canada, and that event did not relinquish our existing British , as relinquishing it requires you to go through specific steps (gaining citizenship elsewhere does not count). Since getting Canadian a few decades ago my parents have always maintained passports in both countries, and I have generally as well.

I think US citizenship is the world's best, if you can choose only one, but British is probably in the top three. I heard recently that it allows visa-less access to more countries than any other. Full access to EU nations, and Great Britain continues to be one of the better countries to live in, so I understand why you would not want to lose it--and the good news is, you won't.

Edited by ExPatty

Good luck!

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I don't think you lose it but you do say that you "renounce" allegiance to the UK in your oath ceremony.


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If you are British born then you are British by birth not descent (through family). In any case, as far as the British government is concerned you will remain British unless you formally renounce your British citizenship to them regardless of whether you gain US citizenship or not.


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Being US citizen has to pay taxes on worldwide income, subjected to FBAR and the latest FATCA.

Someone posted this in another section of VJ.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-us-governments-stupid-tax-war-on-expatriates-2015-02-20?siteid=yhoof2


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To clarify- are you currently living in the USA and have a valid greencard?

Yes, I have a green card since 2012. We are going through ROC at the moment. My husband is active military and we are stationed overseas.

Seconded.

Dual citizenship with Germany, if the OP has that as well, is difficult, but not at all difficult for British.

I already have British and Canadian, as do my parents; we naturalized to Canada, and that event did not relinquish our existing British , as relinquishing it requires you to go through specific steps (gaining citizenship elsewhere does not count). Since getting Canadian a few decades ago my parents have always maintained passports in both countries, and I have generally as well.

I think US citizenship is the world's best, if you can choose only one, but British is probably in the top three. I heard recently that it allows visa-less access to more countries than any other. Full access to EU nations, and Great Britain continues to be one of the better countries to live in, so I understand why you would not want to lose it--and the good news is, you won't.

I hold British and Greek Citizenship.The Greek passport I am willing to give up.No German Citizenship. Being born in Germany doesn't automatically make me a German citizen by law.

So you didn't have to apply for a retention or anything like that? No specific application to fill out? Are you sure?

This is my concern and main question. As I know that German Citizens wishing to become US citizens have to apply for a Retention Certificate and must receive it before they take the Oath or otherwise they will lose German Citizenship.

Yeah, I want to keep my UK one for easier access to EU countries incl. Germany where my family lives.

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Well, I was a kid, but absolutely NOTHING I can find online indicates a person need file any kind of cert with the UK government. Germany is known as a country that doesn't like dual citizenship.

Germany: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_nationality_law#Dual_citizenship

England: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_nationality_law#Dual_nationality_and_dual_citizenship

Remember that country A does not control country B's citizenship. So, regardless of what one country may claim you have done to your other citizenship, it is legally immaterial unless that other country agrees. This is why when you take the oath with the US and you're verbally saying you lose allegiance to another country, only if that other country recognizes this does it remove your citizenship from them. The UK has said this doesn't affect it.

https://www.gov.uk/dual-citizenship


Good luck!

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