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dwightcharles

US Permanent Resident for two years and wants to work for Emirates and be a Cabin Crew

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Hi guys!

I have only been in the United States as a Permanent Resident for 2 years and 3 months to be exact. I understand I cannot yet apply for citizenship because the law requires 5 years of living here.

I want to maintain my resident status and eventually apply to become a citizen however right now there is an opportunity for me to work for Emirates as a Cabin Crew. My concern is that if I do get the job, I will be required to move to Dubai for work.

I don't seek permanent residency or citizenship in Dubai at all. The company just requires its Cabin Crew to live in base.

I will go to the US as much as I can if ever I do get the job because my mom and siblings are here.

Will this affect my resident status at all? Will this be considered abandoning my status?

Thanks a lot. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. :)

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Hi guys!

I will go to the US as much as I can if ever I do get the job because my mom and siblings are here.

Will this affect my resident status at all? Will this be considered abandoning my status?

Thanks a lot. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. :)

but of course it will as you are seeking to accept a job outside the united states.

Factors that may help (possibly delay any findings) are: Annual Income Tax Returns, Maintaining family/community ties. Owning property or renting overseas

It boils down to one's initial intention. Unless you are working for the U.S. Govt overseas you will break your contentious residence hence delaying your eligibility for Citizenship..

You are seeing to move to Dubai permanently as they do not hold bases in the U.S. can you demonstrate that you only planned to work with them for a short period of time..? I would see the re entry permit .. that may hold some proof that you intended to return - soon.

Edited by RICARDO4EVA2

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but of course it will as you are seeking to accept a job outside the united states.

Factors that may help (possibly delay any findings) are: Annual Income Tax Returns, Maintaining family/community ties. Owning property or renting overseas

It boils down to one's initial intention. Unless you are working for the U.S. Govt overseas you will break your contentious residence hence delaying your eligibility for Citizenship..

You are seeing to move to Dubai permanently as they do not hold bases in the U.S. can you demonstrate that you only planned to work with them for a short period of time..? I would see the re entry permit .. that may hold some proof that you intended to return - soon.

Thanks Ricardo.

Yeah, I don't wanna go through all that hassle.

How about if I apply for Cathay Pacific? If I get the job, I will be based in New York but I'll be doing a lot of overseas traveling to Asia.

Will this also affect me other than prolong my eligibility for citizenship? Cuz I have to be physically in the US for 5 years right?

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Thanks Ricardo.

Yeah, I don't wanna go through all that hassle.

How about if I apply for Cathay Pacific? If I get the job, I will be based in New York but I'll be doing a lot of overseas traveling to Asia.

Will this also affect me other than prolong my eligibility for citizenship? Cuz I have to be physically in the US for 5 years right?

As long as your home base is the US, then you are okay. You meet the requirement of having a U.S. resident.

However, your days of physical presence outside the U.S. could delay your ability to file for US citizenship.

You do not need to be physically in the US for 5 years. That is not the requirement.

Perhaps you should review the instructions for Form N-400. There is a flow chart. See if your potential job will allow you to meet the requirements for naturalization.

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As long as your home base is the US, then you are okay. You meet the requirement of having a U.S. resident.

However, your days of physical presence outside the U.S. could delay your ability to file for US citizenship.

You do not need to be physically in the US for 5 years. That is not the requirement.

Perhaps you should review the instructions for Form N-400. There is a flow chart. See if your potential job will allow you to meet the requirements for naturalization.

Thank you so much for responding. Do you know how long or if there's a limit as to when a permanent resident can maintain PR status? I mean can one remain a permanent resident status as long as he wants just as long he stays in the US and renews the green card when it's due?

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Thank you so much for responding. Do you know how long or if there's a limit as to when a permanent resident can maintain PR status? I mean can one remain a permanent resident status as long as he wants just as long he stays in the US and renews the green card when it's due?

As long as you follow the rules for maintaining your LPR status, you can remain a LPR as long as you want. All you have to do is renew the GC every 10 years using the I-90 form. It is up to you whether you want the benefits and hassles of becoming a USC.

Dave

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As long as you follow the rules for maintaining your LPR status, you can remain a LPR as long as you want. All you have to do is renew the GC every 10 years using the I-90 form. It is up to you whether you want the benefits and hassles of becoming a USC.

Dave

Thanks Dave! You're awesome! :)

Edited by dwightcharles

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This is a do-it-yourself website.

Did you even bother to look up how to maintain your LPR status as I suggeasted in previous posts?

I actually have been researching answers to my last question even before I posted on here. I know that this is a "do-it-yourself-website" and I don't just post anything on here without doing prior research.

To answer your question, yes, I did look up how to maintain LPR status.

There are just some things that I am unclear with and that's why I post here because I find it helpful for someone to explain things to me in layman's term.

I am so sorry if I inconvenienced you but thanks for helping.

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