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Hi all - I just got an automated reminder from the VisaJourney website folks to let me know that we haven't updated our status in over 12 months. So I took a look at our status and it shows the N-400 process of getting US citizenship is the last step. I think to my wife, who is Chinese, this has not necessarily been a goal and she is in no rush to talk about it and certainly not ready to start the process. So I thought I would write a post to see what kind of reaction we get and hopefully some helpful comments on why she should (or should not) get her citizenship.

The main reasons to get citizenship in my mind would be:

1) to have a US Passport that allows much more freedom to travel.

2) to potentially make it easier for her to invite her family to visit (not sure if this actually matters)

The main reason she is hesitant is that she is worried about how it may affect her ability to reintegrate back to China in the future (possibly after I die).

Are there other people in this situation? Does everyone who comes to the US want to be a citizen?

James


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There is no presumption that a LPR should become a US citizen at any point. She can keep her LPR status for life if she so wishes. If she can manage to keep both citizenships then there is no reason for her not to do so.

Becoming a US citizen will afford her the privilege of voting, more than anything else. In addition she will be able to travel virtually everywhere without visa and she'll be able to count with the assistance of US consulates abroad if she should find herself in need while traveling.

In the end it doesnt matter what other immigrants do, so much as she has to determine what works best for her.

Good luck!


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For me, since Mexico allows for dual citizenship, it was about several things (I'm not a citizen yet; I'll take the oath on March 5th):

1. The ability to vote/participate politically if I'm going to be living here permanently.

2. Being able to move to another country temporarily without it being a problem (I don't plan on this, but the line of work that I'm in means I need to be flexible about where I live--I've lived all over the U.S. already). If I remained a permanent resident and faced the choice of moving abroad for work, I'd have to either turn down the opportunity or abandon my PR status and restart the process.

3. Not having to pay to renew my green card--yes, I had to pay the fees for the N-400, but now I'm done.

4. The peace of mind that comes with being a citizen--it's not that I expect anything bad to happen, but I can rest easy knowing that I can travel more easily and that I don't have to worry about losing my green card or deportation (not that I've ever done anything that would make me deportable!). For example, during my last entry into the U.S., I was stopped at POE because of a mix-up in my file from all the way back when I was on an F-1 student visa (a mistake by an officer at my university). I had been a LPR for over 2 years and had entered the country several times on my green card without issues and yet this time it *was* a problem--and it cost me time and anxiety at secondary inspection and made me miss my flight connection.


Naturalization

November 10th, 2014 (Day 0) - Mailed N-400 to Arizona Lockbox

November 13th, 2014 (Day 1) - Application received in Phoenix

November 14th, 2014 (Day 2) - Priority date on NOA

November 17th, 2014 (Day 5) - Check cashed

November 19th, 2014 (Day 7) - NOA received

November 29th, 2014 (Day 17) - Biometrics appointment letter received

December 1st, 2014 (Day 19) - Walk-in biometrics completed

December 6th, 2014 (Day 24) - Yellow letter received

January 7th, 2015 (Day 56) - Online notification of in line for interview

January 8th, 2015 (Day 57) - Online notification of interview scheduled

January 15th, 2015 (Day 64) - Interview letter received

February 13th, 2015 (Day 93) - Naturalization interview: APPROVED!

February 17th, 2015 (Day 97) - Online notification of oath ceremony scheduled

February 20th, 2015 (Day 100) - Oath ceremony letter received

March 5th, 2015 (Day 113) - Oath ceremony: U.S. CITIZEN!

ROC

November 15th, 2013 (Day 0) - Mailed I-751 to California Service Center

November 18th, 2013 (Day 1) - Application received at CSC; NOA date

November 20th, 2013 (Day 3) - Check cashed

November 22nd, 2013 (Day 5) - NOA received

November 25th, 2013 (Day 8) - Biometrics appointment letter received

December 13th, 2013 (Day 26) - Biometrics appointment

March 24th, 2014 (Day 127) - Card production ordered!

March 31st, 2014 (Day 134) - 10-year green card received!

AOS from F-1 Visa (June 2nd, 2011 - Wedding)
November 9th, 2011 (Day 0) - Mailed I-130/I-485/I-765/I-131 to Chicago Lockbox
November 10th, 2011 (Day 1) - Application received in Chicago
November 15th, 2011 (Day 6) - E-mail notification

November 16th, 2011 (Day 7) - Checks cashed
November 18th, 2011 (Day 9) - NOAs received
November 21st, 2011 (Day 12) - Biometrics appointment notice received
November 23rd, 2011 (Day 14) - Walk-in biometrics completed
January 5th, 2012 (Day 57) - Interview scheduled notice AND notice of card production for EAD and AP
January 13th, 2012 (Day 65) - Combination EAD/AP card received
February 7th, 2012 (Day 90) - Interview: APPROVED!
February 10th, 2012 (Day 93) - Green card production ordered
February 15th, 2012 (Day 98) - Green card received!

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US Citizenship makes it easier to bring relatives to the US as legal residents. And you do have the resources of the US Department of State at your disposal while overseas. So, if things go bad while traveling, the US will do all it can to bring you "home".

Edited by I AM NOT THAT GUY

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Hi all - I just got an automated reminder from the VisaJourney website folks to let me know that we haven't updated our status in over 12 months. So I took a look at our status and it shows the N-400 process of getting US citizenship is the last step. I think to my wife, who is Chinese, this has not necessarily been a goal and she is in no rush to talk about it and certainly not ready to start the process. So I thought I would write a post to see what kind of reaction we get and hopefully some helpful comments on why she should (or should not) get her citizenship.

The main reasons to get citizenship in my mind would be:

1) to have a US Passport that allows much more freedom to travel.

2) to potentially make it easier for her to invite her family to visit (not sure if this actually matters)

The main reason she is hesitant is that she is worried about how it may affect her ability to reintegrate back to China in the future (possibly after I die).

Are there other people in this situation? Does everyone who comes to the US want to be a citizen?

James

I don't remember the specifics, but a mom's friend was a permanent resident married to a USC. She never changed her status for years. When her husband passed away (and I don't remember the specific details) not being a USC sort of complicated a few things going on in her life and her general sentiment was that she regretted putting it off. Most of the arguments for not becoming a USC are steeped in nationalism, not facts.

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For me, since Mexico allows for dual citizenship, it was about several things (I'm not a citizen yet; I'll take the oath on March 5th):

1. The ability to vote/participate politically if I'm going to be living here permanently.

2. Being able to move to another country temporarily without it being a problem (I don't plan on this, but the line of work that I'm in means I need to be flexible about where I live--I've lived all over the U.S. already). If I remained a permanent resident and faced the choice of moving abroad for work, I'd have to either turn down the opportunity or abandon my PR status and restart the process.

3. Not having to pay to renew my green card--yes, I had to pay the fees for the N-400, but now I'm done.

4. The peace of mind that comes with being a citizen--it's not that I expect anything bad to happen, but I can rest easy knowing that I can travel more easily and that I don't have to worry about losing my green card or deportation (not that I've ever done anything that would make me deportable!). For example, during my last entry into the U.S., I was stopped at POE because of a mix-up in my file from all the way back when I was on an F-1 student visa (a mistake by an officer at my university). I had been a LPR for over 2 years and had entered the country several times on my green card without issues and yet this time it *was* a problem--and it cost me time and anxiety at secondary inspection and made me miss my flight connection.

My fiance hasnt gotten to that point yet gut citizenship for us would no one, nor any government can separate us ever again. Visas will never cause us to be apart.

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Jabl2rom bringing up the person he knows whose husband died and the fact that one of your concerns, James_and_JoAnne, is about what might your wife do if you die reminded me another thing that did factor into my decision but that I neglected to mention before:

When I first got married, several older acquaintances (all of them older British women married to American men, in fact) told me that they had naturalized recently, for estate purposes: there is a limit on the amount you can inherit to a non-U.S. citizen spouse tax-free. As a young and broke couple, this is not a concern for us right now, but it may very well be in the future.

More information about estate taxation for non-U.S. citizen spouses is here: http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/estate-planning-when-you-re-married-noncitizen.html


Naturalization

November 10th, 2014 (Day 0) - Mailed N-400 to Arizona Lockbox

November 13th, 2014 (Day 1) - Application received in Phoenix

November 14th, 2014 (Day 2) - Priority date on NOA

November 17th, 2014 (Day 5) - Check cashed

November 19th, 2014 (Day 7) - NOA received

November 29th, 2014 (Day 17) - Biometrics appointment letter received

December 1st, 2014 (Day 19) - Walk-in biometrics completed

December 6th, 2014 (Day 24) - Yellow letter received

January 7th, 2015 (Day 56) - Online notification of in line for interview

January 8th, 2015 (Day 57) - Online notification of interview scheduled

January 15th, 2015 (Day 64) - Interview letter received

February 13th, 2015 (Day 93) - Naturalization interview: APPROVED!

February 17th, 2015 (Day 97) - Online notification of oath ceremony scheduled

February 20th, 2015 (Day 100) - Oath ceremony letter received

March 5th, 2015 (Day 113) - Oath ceremony: U.S. CITIZEN!

ROC

November 15th, 2013 (Day 0) - Mailed I-751 to California Service Center

November 18th, 2013 (Day 1) - Application received at CSC; NOA date

November 20th, 2013 (Day 3) - Check cashed

November 22nd, 2013 (Day 5) - NOA received

November 25th, 2013 (Day 8) - Biometrics appointment letter received

December 13th, 2013 (Day 26) - Biometrics appointment

March 24th, 2014 (Day 127) - Card production ordered!

March 31st, 2014 (Day 134) - 10-year green card received!

AOS from F-1 Visa (June 2nd, 2011 - Wedding)
November 9th, 2011 (Day 0) - Mailed I-130/I-485/I-765/I-131 to Chicago Lockbox
November 10th, 2011 (Day 1) - Application received in Chicago
November 15th, 2011 (Day 6) - E-mail notification

November 16th, 2011 (Day 7) - Checks cashed
November 18th, 2011 (Day 9) - NOAs received
November 21st, 2011 (Day 12) - Biometrics appointment notice received
November 23rd, 2011 (Day 14) - Walk-in biometrics completed
January 5th, 2012 (Day 57) - Interview scheduled notice AND notice of card production for EAD and AP
January 13th, 2012 (Day 65) - Combination EAD/AP card received
February 7th, 2012 (Day 90) - Interview: APPROVED!
February 10th, 2012 (Day 93) - Green card production ordered
February 15th, 2012 (Day 98) - Green card received!

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Hi all - I just got an automated reminder from the VisaJourney website folks to let me know that we haven't updated our status in over 12 months. So I took a look at our status and it shows the N-400 process of getting US citizenship is the last step. I think to my wife, who is Chinese, this has not necessarily been a goal and she is in no rush to talk about it and certainly not ready to start the process. So I thought I would write a post to see what kind of reaction we get and hopefully some helpful comments on why she should (or should not) get her citizenship.

The main reasons to get citizenship in my mind would be:

1) to have a US Passport that allows much more freedom to travel.

2) to potentially make it easier for her to invite her family to visit (not sure if this actually matters)

The main reason she is hesitant is that she is worried about how it may affect her ability to reintegrate back to China in the future (possibly after I die).

Are there other people in this situation? Does everyone who comes to the US want to be a citizen?

James

If she is giving some consideration for retiring in China (particularly after your death),

then you guys ought to compare the retirement social security and various insurance benefits

between the two countries.

If she has worked many years in China, then potentially she may still have

various insurance funds like, retire, medical, housing, etc.

There is a possibility of her being able to collect on both Chinese and your's and her

US social security...not 100% but it's worth looking into things like this.

That said...I hope you live a long time with her. :D


10-04-2013 We met online
11-21-2013 We met in person in Shanghai for 2 weeks

12-13-2013 I-129F packet sent via express

12-19-2013 USCIS NOA #1 (text and email) received

12-24-2013 USCIS assigns Alien Registration Number
12-31-2013 USCIS NOA #1 hard copy received
06-02-2014 USCIS web site shows NOA #2 approval
06-06-2014 USCIS web site shows case sent to NVC

06-xx-2014 Fiancee acquired birth, marriage, and police certificates from local police station (wrong)

06-16-2014 NVC creates case with GUZ### number

06-19-2014 NVC sends case sent to Guangzhou, China
06-24-2014 Received packet 3 express mail from embassy
06-25-2014 Completed DS-160 and paid K1 visa fee

06-26-2014 Mailed packet 3 response back to Embassy

06-26-2014 Requested police certificate from Russian embassy

07-08-2014 Received packet 4 email from Embassy

07-17-2014 Picked up Russian police certificate

07-25-2014 Fiancee medical exam (received MMR & Varicella, but they missed required TD shot)

07-31-2014 Picked up medical exam reports

08-01-2014 Request (correct) birth, marriage, and police certificates from Notarial Service (GongZhengChu)

08-06-2014 Picked up birth, marriage, and police certificates from Notarial Service

08-14-2014 Passed Interview Guangzhou embassy

09-01-2014 Received passport, visa, & sealed envelope

09-13-2014 POE

09-17-2014 Went to CBP office to get (US entry) I-94 updated correctly

09-18-2014 Applied for Social Security Card
09-19-2014 Applied for Marriage License (via online)
09-25-2014 Received Social Security Card
09-30-2014 Picked up Marriage License
10-09-2014 Marriage by Justice of Peace
10-09-2014 Got Certified Marriage Certificate Copies
10-17-2014 Received a letter from SS office that they need the marriage license
10-09-2014 Applied to change the social security card name
10-24-2014 Went back to SS office to provide the marriage certificate documents again!!!
12-09-2014 Submitted AOS, EAD, and AP
12-16-2014 Received 16 emails and 16 text NOA messages
01-05-2015 Received Biometrics appointment letter for (01-12-2015)
01-12-2015 Had Biometrics (fingerprint & picture) - Required Marriage Certificate!!!
02-17-2015 EAD and AP is approved
02-23-2015 Received AP is approval letter
02-25-2015 Received EAD/AP combo card (expires 02/16/2016)
02-27-2015 Applied for SS card name change (they took her SS card)
02-27-2015 Driver's learner permit test was denied since the SS card was given to SS office for name change
03-17-2015 Received SS card with married name
03-17-2015 Started to change all her accounts to married name
03-23-2015 Received potential interview waiver letter
03-27-2015 DMV rejects learner's permit due to "legal status=pending" and vision test failure
04-05-2015 Vision test for learner's permit
04-06-2015 DPS sent us letter that DHS cleared my wife's status to acquire driver's license.
04-10-2015 Passed Driver Learner's Permit
04-22-2015 Received Driver Learner's Permit ID card (expires 02/16/2016)
08-27-2015 Green Card approved
08-31-2015 Received Green Card "Welcome Notice Was Mailed" letter
09-05-2015 Received Green card
10-26-2015 Passed Driver's License Road Test (on 3rd attempt)
11-03-2015 Received Driver's License (expires 02/16/2022)
11-06-2015 Applied to remove conditional work remark on SS card
11-23-2015 Received updated Social Security Card.
- - - - - - - - - - Pending Future Processing - - - - - - - - - -
05-27-2017 File 10 Year Green Card
08-27-2017 2 Year Green Card Expires
05-27-2018 File USC

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Not sure if this has any bearing,but, my wife is filipina and she said that after she is out of the country a certain amount of time (not sure how long) she will in effect lose her citizenship, she can get it back easy enough by filing the correct paperwork and paying the fees. She does not think it applies to being ofw, just for citizenship purpose of another country. It is why they call the Philippines THE FEE-lippines.

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My wife has no desire to give up her Chinese citizenship to become a US citizen. Besides, most Chinese think America is boring, not everyone wants to become a USC. My wife is here only because she loves me,that's why she made the sacrifice to leave family and friends and move 8,000 miles across the pond.

Will it effect family to come visit by not becoming a USC... I don't think so, my wife's friend just had her parents here visiting from China. All depends on if they proove they have strong ties to their country so they won't stay in US. Besides its easier for us to travel back to China to visit family and friends.

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Top 10 Reasons to Consider Becoming a US Citizen

By Katherine at Legal Language
Posted on 03/04/2011
In Citizenship, Immigration

434535_statue_of_liberty_12.jpgOnce you have a US green card, it can be continually renewed — becoming a US citizen is never required.

However, becoming a US citizen can offer many advantages to permanent residents. Check out 10 reasons why it may be the right choice for you!

If You Become a US Citizen, You Will: 1. Have the right to vote.

Lawful permanent residents are not exempt from US laws, taxes and other political measures. Think about becoming a US citizen in order to vote on political representatives as well as local, state and federal ballot measures.

2. Be able to run for public office.

As a matter of fact, why not run for a political office yourself? You may not be able to be the president, but becoming a US citizen permits you to hold numerous public offices — just look at Arnold Schwarzenegger.

3. Be eligible for federal employment or benefits.

If you want a career with the government, it’s possible — but you have to be a US citizen. And you may have to act fast — some government agencies do not consider new US citizens eligible for certain careers or benefits if they do not start the naturalization process within six months of their eligibility to do so.

4. Be able to travel abroad for long periods of time.

Many green card holders travel frequently, especially if many of their family members are in other countries. But if permanent residents spend more than six months a year traveling, they might not be admitted back into the United States — their green card may be considered “abandoned” and they will have to start the immigration process all over again. One of the perks of becoming a US citizen? You can travel for as long as you want with no restrictions!

5. Not be deported.

It doesn’t just happen to undocumented immigrants — permanent residents are eligible for deportation, and it doesn’t even have to be a very serious offense. Some believe that courts are harder on non-US citizens, and non-citizen immigrants and permanent residents don’t have as many options to take a plea bargain or do jail time or community service.

6. Be able to sponsor your family for green cards.

Becoming a US citizen means you can sponsor relatives for a green card — everyone from your parents and siblings to your spouse. Additionally, if you have children under the age of 18 in your custody, they will automatically become citizens along with you.

7. Benefit from US tax laws.

If your spouse is also a US citizen, you can bequeath real estate to him or her that will be exempt from property taxes. US tax laws also allow other free exchanges of real estate between married US citizens.

8. Become eligible for free money.

Would you like to apply for university scholarships or be eligible for in-state college tuition? Perhaps you want to try and get a government grant or monetary award. Many of these options are available only to US citizens.

9. Become a US passport holder.

Only US citizens can get US passports, a coveted travel document. When you travel abroad with a US passport, you’ll be supported by US Embassies or Consulates if you need any assistance.

10. Not necessarily have to give up your current citizenship.

While it’s true that the US has new citizens renounce their previous citizenships in taking the Oath of Allegiance during naturalization ceremonies, you can ask to omit that part of the oath if you want to retain your previous citizenship as well. While dual citizenship used to be banned in the United States, the Supreme Court struck down those laws — so if it’s the only thing keeping you from becoming a US citizen, it may be time to reconsider!

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Not sure if this has any bearing,but, my wife is filipina and she said that after she is out of the country a certain amount of time (not sure how long) she will in effect lose her citizenship, she can get it back easy enough by filing the correct paperwork and paying the fees. She does not think it applies to being ofw, just for citizenship purpose of another country. It is why they call the Philippines THE FEE-lippines.

She will only lose her citizenship by an affirmative action, for example, by formally renouncing her citizenship before a US Foreign Affairs official while outside the US. Once you lose your US Citizenship, you cannot get it back (well, maybe by a private bill passed by Congress).

http://travel.state.gov/content/travel/english/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/renunciation-of-citizenship.html

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/8/1481

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US Citizenship makes it easier to bring relatives to the US as legal residents. And you do have the resources of the US Department of State at your disposal while overseas. So, if things go bad while traveling, the US will do all it can to bring you "home

They will not do that much. I had a bad experience in Thailand once. All they would do is make a phone call and if no one answer they say sorry is there someone else you will like to call. I wound up leaving the embassy,as they were of no help to me. Lucky my phone is unlock and I had enough money to buy a sim card there and was able to get a hold of someone I knew from the states. that has relatives in Bangkok. I had to wait in front of the embassy for about 3 hours, as I did not have enough money to do anything else, But I do not think the embassy really help me at all. The guy did not seem to really care what happen.


ROC
Service Center : Nebraska Service Center
Consulate : Manila, Philippines
Marriage (if applicable): 2014-05-20
I-130 Sent : 2014-10-06
I-130 NOA1 : 2014-10-09
I-130 RFE for NSO copy of marriage certificate: 2014-11-03
I-130 RFE Sent : 2014-11-18
I-130 Approved : 2014-12-07
NVC Received : 2014-12-23
NVC case number: 2015-02-04
Received DS-261 / AOS Bill : 2015-02-04
Pay AOS Bill : 2015-02-05
Submit DS-261 : 2015-02-05
Sent AOS Package : 2015-02-09
Sent IV Package : 2015-02-09
Scan date : 2015-02-10
Receive IV Bill : 2015-03-03
Pay IV Bill : 2015-03-06
Submit DS-260: 2015-3-12
Case Completed at NVC : 2015-03-20
Receive Instruction and Interview appointment letter: 2015-3-27
Medical complete: 2015-04-08
Interview Date : 2015-05-08
Interview Result : Approved
Visa Received : 2015-05-13

Date of US Entry : 2015-06-09
 

Date of Social Security card receive : 06-2015

Date of Green Card received 07-2015

Date of ROC FILE 05-19-2017

 I-751 NOA Date 05-26-2017

   

http://jerryjja.wix.com/filipinasaswa?_ga=1.194674661.91538870.1441656248

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Does anybody know if social security survivor benefits are impacted by citizenship? If a us citizen dies and his/her benefits would normally be paid to the spouse s survivor benefits, does a permanent resident get the money?

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