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30th June, "Revolt", Egypt

#1 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 16 June 2013 - 10:00 AM

If anyone's been following the news in Egypt there are a lot of issues that are leading up to the demonstration on 30th June. There are a lot of sides to the issue and it's like untangling a big old knot. The economic situation is bad. You can read about some of it in the article Watching Egypt Crumble.  
 
Is this the Egyptian Revolution 2.0 version people have been talking about that's been coming for months?  Is this the prelude to the "Egyptian Civil War" that others are salivating over the idea of? Lately I've heard and read about go to war in Syria for jihad, go to war in Ethiopia for water, go to war with the US and Israel because they are the true enemy, and now it's a civil war in Egypt because the revolution isn't over. The recent Egyptian revolution is touted as one of the most quick and peaceful revolutions in history. I guess we'll see if they really want a bloody revolution like in Les Miserable set during the French Revolution. Let's hope it still remains largely peaceful with little bloodshed.
 
The 30th June Protest is spurred on by the Tamarod aka "Rebel" petition. Most of the news these past few days has been about this up coming open-ended sit-in at the Presidential Palace on 30th June. It sounds like it could be a huge demonstration. The "Rebel" group has 7 million signatures. Which falls just short of half of their 15 million signatures goal for their petition to call for Morsi to step down and hold early elections.
 
The Al-Wasat Party is calling for an "urgent national reconciliation meeting" ahead of 30th June demonstration because of fears of violence at this demonstration and to discuss the issues.  Source  
 
Those they called to the meeting include:
 
The Wasat Party, Abdel-Ghafar Shuk of the Socialist Popular Alliance Party, Ihab Shiha of the Asala Party, Mohamed ElBaradei of the Constitution Party, Mohamed Saad El-Katatni of the Freedom and Justice Party, Amr Moussa of the Conference Party, Amr Hamzawy of the Free Egypt Party, Nasr Abdel-Salam of the Construction and Development Party, Hamdeen Sabbahi of the Egyptian Popular Current, Abdel-Moneim Abul-Fotouh of the Strong Egypt Party, Abu El-Ela Madi of Al-Wasat Party, Ayman Nour of Al-Ghad Party, Sayed El-Badawy of the Wafd Party, Emad Abdel-Ghafour of Al-Watan Party, Younis Makhyoun of El-Nour Party, Mohamed Abul-Ghar of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party and Hazem Salah Abu-Ismail of the Salafist Raya Party.
 
This 30th June demonstration is being spun by the MB and Islamists as a cover by the opposition for bloodshed. I can see how they'd have that idea with the recent second half of a show aired by the popular Bassam Youseef where the musical performance included the Egyptian version of Les Miserable.  In the last half minute Youssef sings with the group editing the words to the French Revolution song. If you know the history of the French Revolution it's one of the most bloody in history. LINK
 
They sing:
 
Here is the voice of the audience I can hear it
Calling for a change
Bread, dignity and humanity
on going life bread for the poor
the weak and the helpless
feel the light in their heart again
and their days turn to the better

 

They also have good reason to be concerned based on previous experiences with large demonstrations getting out of control. Plus Egypt Islamists are calling for counter-demonstrations. Their demonstrations are scheduled for the 21st June. Source Interestingly enough the Salafists have stayed away from the press on this one to avoid a "war like tone". I kind of like their statement in the article about it. It seemed more collaborative and peaceful, but I really can't be sure about them with everything I've read in them in the news since their rise to power. 
 
Then you've got Gamaa Islamiya leader El-Zomor saying "Communists want violence in Egypt's streets".  They condemn the 30th June demonstrations because it's against the people's will, and say join the counter-demonstrations and defeat them like we did during the revolution.  Source
 
Really?  Who are these communists you speak of?  I beg to differ that it is the will of the people being done because the people were promised inclusion in the democratic process by the candidate they voted into power and the people have all but been left out as he preformed a naked power grab aligning the parliament with his people. It is only the "Islamist will" that is being done. This is not the democratic process that was promised. It is a bastardization of it!  
 
Morsi has been accused of suppressing or seeking to suppress opponents and journalists who criticize him by accusing them of defamation.  Human rights lawyer Gamal Eid says there were four times more complaints about insults to the president" during the first 200 days of Morsi's presidency than under the Hosni Mubarak's entire 30-year rule. Source Freedom of speech is not being protected as the President promised in public appearances that he wouldn't seek prosecution for protesters or what was said about him. Since then protesters are being prosecuted and the world watched the huge debacle with Bassam Youseef, Egypt's John Stewart, being brought in for questioning for insulting the president on his satire comedy show. This only helped his viewership grow to 20 million plus and further his drive not to have his voice silenced.
 
Then there was the ruling against the NGO's in Egypt and Morsi's latest laws basically making it impossible for NGO's or any outside interference with his new government thus isolating Egypt further. Judicial Travesty in Egypt  And the Egyptians hate the US for it because they think we're supporting the MB.Source
 
For the longest time after the revolution I was asking myself, "Where are the police?  Where is the security?" I get the security situation in Egypt now and why it is the way it is. The original start day of the revolution called "The Day of Rage" was scheduled to be on the same day as the national "Police Day" for a purpose.
 

Thousands of Egyptians took to the street on January 25, 2011, which used to be celebrated as Police Day, to protest security agencies’ oppression under Mubarak.

 
The Egyptian police were over powered and disgraced by the protesters and Mubarak had to call in the Army.  The Army used the youth based uprising to oust Mubarak. Then then Muslim Brotherhood ousted the Military. Now the opposition is trying to oust the Muslim Brotherhood who promised to be inclusive but have shown to be anything but.
 
The Egyptian government has no checks and balances other than the people demonstrating in the streets and the judiciary branch "somewhat". The parliament is seen as largely lopsided MB. Then the upper parliament was nullified by the Judiciary ruling saying they were illegally appointed but can remain and serve without power. Who didn't see that one coming when Morsi started appointing his own rubber stamp people just like Mubarak circumventing the election?  Now the lower parliament that was voted in has also recently being ruled illegitimate but still has law passing powers.
 
Meanwhile the President and the MB just shrug off the people demonstrating and the judiciary rulings as they're in a full on power grab in complete disregard for the multiple fractions of society that make up the fabric of Egypt that have largely lived peacefully side-by-side for decades. They not only excluded anyone else from writing the constitution the MB rushed to make a solely Islamic constitution where 9 year old girls can become brides. Yes, that really has happened and is law now! They also blame the opposition for not being able to distinguish between what they are responsible for and the problems they've inherited from decades of corruption.


"Meanwhile, in their evaluation of the government’s performance, citizens should distinguish between problems resulting from the failure of this government and the problems inherited from previous regimes that for long decades robbed the country's wealth."

Source
 
I get that it's only been a year and that democracy is a slow moving beast. However, the MB's separatist attitude and focus on making an Islamically ruled nation, and screw everybody else that has a stake in this pie instead of including them, is what's really screwing this myopic government. They need to come together for the common good not separate the particulates, and everybody who doesn't align with their way of thinking is on the outs, "oh well sorry".  
 
Things like auctioning off gifts received by state officials isn't going to do much for their treasury.  LINK
 
Laws passing harsher punishments for street crimes by an illegitimately ruled Shura Council (Upper Parliament) is pointless and isn't going to get the country anywhere when the police are disgraced and there is a security vacuum.  LINK
 
Tourism is in the dumps because of the instability. Article: Come to Egypt you'll practically have the place to yourself  It's a cute article, actually, talking about Upper Egypt somewhat and how to take advantage of the lull in tourism. Though I don't agree that security is reinforced when I've read the opposite is going on and that in effect is probably why tourists are keeping away.
 
Over 300 police officers have died since the revolution. My husband explained that it's not because of outlaws killing police so much as it about how the police were corrupt. They'd kidnap and torture people. Then post the person's humiliation on Youtube showing them being slapped, punched, kicked, electrocuted. Basically the police had an utter disregard for the rule of law and abused their authority. People feared them but over came that fear since the revolution and those 300 dead officers are most likely because of an old debt being repaid. People don't respect the police and so the crime rate rises because the police have lost their authority.
 
Over in the Sinai Peninsula near Sharm it's become a common place for tourists to be kidnapped by Bedouin Tribal members seeking to use them as bargaining chips to negotiate with the authorities. While some of the more concerning heavily armed attacks on authority have also happened in this region.  Source
 
When there is no security in Egypt because it was corrupt and the people revolted against that demanding basic human rights, respect, dignity and to have the basic needs met like a living wage and bread, and the government they freely elected promised all of them inclusion in the democratic process, and they've come to discover they've been lied to about it. Then it's no wonder things are a real mess. The new government is also compounding the problem while they focus on menial things that only serve their interests.
 
Meanwhile the country's history is also being destroy and the culture is under attack. The beautiful Sufi's sacred sites from the 9th century are being bombed by the rising Salafists influence as their line of thought is being forced down people's throats.  Source  
 
The Salafists also suggested to cover the Great Pyramids of Giza in wax and do away with the other historic sites around Egypt as well.  Source  
 
During this turmoil Egyptian heritage sites such as the 14th century Bab Al Wazir Historic Gate of Cairo was bulldozed so someone could slap up a new building. The Bab Al Wazir gate, one of the medieval portals to the old city of Cairo, was among the remaining gates of the Islamic city. Source
 
And Islamists are also attacking the culture through not just their historical sites but their artistic heritage. See Burning Down the House: Artistic Freedom Under Fire  It's about the Cairo Opera House Strike and the current demonstrations in Zamalek at the Ministry of Culture.  

 

Only a few weeks earlier, a lawmaker and member of the ultraconservative Islamist Nour Party called for banning ballet from the Opera House, denouncing it as "the art of nudity" and for "spreading immorality."  
 
"This comment [by the Nour lawmaker] is not a comment. It is a potential draft law," says poet Fatema Naoot, noting the rise of political Islam in post-revolutionary Egypt. "Previously, we would leave them, we would say this is freedom of speech."
 
"But now that these people are our lawmakers, they have the ability to deprive us from [the arts] if they want to," she says.
 
No more Opera, no more ballet?  In the last year drinking alcohol and bikini's at the beach also came under attack until the businesses interfered and they realize the economy needs tourism. 
 
The latest is Salifists want to stop women from being on TV in sitcoms.  Actresses needn't apply for roles in Egypt's all male TV sitcom They say there is a demand for this kind of content but it's probably another experiment that will largely fail. 
 
The only solution offered on Egypt in the news lately is one Thomas Friedman wrote in the New York Times about a sustainable solution. He used an insightful analogy about how everyone has a stake in the environment that serves them more than serving themselves. Egypt's Perilous Drift I agree in a way. Egypt needs a green revolution. I mentioned before about how they can use their own garbage to get the energy they need to make solar powered devices to power their buildings or biofuel to create methane to cook their food. It will take work and a change in the mindset to see the dignity and value in it.
 
However, the possible solutions hardly seem to be discussed as much as what's wrong with the society, people's needs, and their enormously large expectations. Until the basic needs of all the people of the Egyptian society are met like food, shelter, water, clothing, and civility then everything else can't seem to fall into place.
 
Probably the most telling item of the gravity of this upcoming 30th June grass-roots demonstration is the extreme measures the current government is taking to protect themselves.
 

Security measures for the June 30 protest are really surprising. The presidency tasked two contracting companies with putting up two big gates in the street located between the area of “Bawba 5” and Al-Salam castle and asked them to put up electronic doors through which cars and people heading to the castle may pass. The street will be completely closed and will only be used to confront any attempts to storm the castle. Electronic iron gates of a two-meter height, and that come up from the ground in cases of emergencies, will also be put up. All gates will be linked to electric detonators through an electric circuit with high voltage, and they can electrocute anyone who places his foot within an area of one meter square. All this will be done before the end of the month. Meanwhile, a security official said that a week before the protest, the republican guards will close 14 streets around the castle, using concrete walls and barbed wire. Tanks and armored vehicles will be stationed behind all five doors and they will provide protection from inside.

 

Egypt's first democratically elected president is terrified

 


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#2 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 22 June 2013 - 07:57 AM

A lot has happened since I posted this. 

 

First, officials of the Tamarod petition have claimed to have collected well over the 15 million signatures to take the confidence away from the elected President.  Source

 

In a move seen as a desperate attempt to solidify his power over the cities of the opposition strongholds President Morsi appointed controversial governors:  Source   Protests broke out across Egypt because of it, but the appointment of the governor to Luxor was perhaps the most disturbing. To date the appointed governor has not agreed to resign despite being locked out of his office and the general uproar.  LINK

 

Somewhere in there the US Ambassador to Cairo came under fire for comments made about the scheduled June 30th protests.  Source  

 

The Egyptian President hastily launched an online PR campaign to defend his Presidency and document his first year in office in order to be more transparent. LINK and LINK  Hey, it's a new democracy.

 

Then yesterday June 21st the pro-Morsi counter-demonstrations were held.  Some estimated that tens of thousands showed up while other reports say up to one hundred thousand protesters came out.  They bused in people from all over Egypt.  LINK  When the protests are isolated to one or two cities I wouldn't use the headline "Egypt Explodes with Protesters".  Anyways, a bigger indication of unrest was seen earlier in the week in multiple cities across Egypt when protests broke out because of the new governors that were appointed by the President. One very good point that was brought up by Egyptians quoted in the media was, "Why doesn't Egypt also hold elections for governors and mayors so the people can have who they want to represent them from their own area; instead of doing things the old way which is just like the old regime?"

 

On the same day as the June 21st protests John Stewart appeared on Bassam Youssef's show "The Program" in Cairo.  This was the best link I've found and includes the 20 minute video segment which is in mostly English on their website article.  LINK  The segment was pre-taped and aired that Friday perhaps giving a nod to the escalating local current events. In Stewart's words, "Because we Americans don't know what's going on in the world."  biggrin.png

 

The Egypt Airport is on high alert for the 30th June protest.  Link  From June 28th until July 1st.

 

And if you experienced the first revolution this may sound like old news but if you're in Egypt for June 30th, which I know some of you are visiting your family there, below is a quick list of "just in case" measures to take provided by the online Expat Communities for Cairo.  Hopefully you check in between the rolling electrical blackouts before the 30th.

 

This second earth quake in Egypt on June 30th may be larger than the first earthquake in Egypt Jan 25th.

 

 

  • Drinking water: approximately 4 litres per person per day. Stock enough for at least 3 days
  • Non-perishable food: at least a 3 day supply. Think of rice, pastas and canned goods. Don’t forget the ‘comfort food’ items like chocolate and cookies. If buying powdered goods such as packet soups and milk – remember to purchase extra water to prepare it.
  • A can opener
  • Alcohol if you drink it. Stocking up on Sakkara or some wine in advance of Ramadan is the norm here anyway so just do it earlier than planned.
  • Dish soap/washing up liquid
  • Trash/rubbish bags
  • A first aid kit & first aid book
  • Prescription medications. Think blood pressure pills, asthma inhalers, birth control pills or insulin for example.
  • Eye drops and surgical masks in case of tear gas.
  • A flashlight and candles
  • Batteries
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Toiletries: toilet paper, soap, toothpaste, feminine hygiene products, wet wipes etc.
  • Cash: Try and keep small denominations as change may not be available. Banks may close and ATM services may be disrupted.
  • Passports, driving licences, company ID
  • Copies of important documents like birth/marriage certificates, banking details and medical records.
  • Emergency contact numbers – include landline numbers in case of mobile network outages. Ensure family and friends overseas have land line numbers also. You may not be able to call out but they may be able to call in.
  • Mobile phone chargers
  • Mobile phone credit – if applicable

 

To Complete Your Crisis Kit …

  • Include food and extra water for your pets
  • If you have a small child, include diapers, wipes, formula, etc.
  • Be sure to factor in the needs of any seniors, pregnant or nursing mums, or special needs people in your household.
  • Activities for children and adults: books, games, puzzles. Remember that internet services may be cut and electricity may not be available to charge iPads and laptops.
  • Bottled gas if appropriate. The food you stored will be no fun if you can’t prepare it
  • Matches – you’ll need these for the candles and the gas.
  • Keep extra water in buckets in bathrooms to flush toilets etc.

 

Safe Locations and Routes

  • Swap home addresses and landline numbers with trusted friends and have an alternate location to move to should unrest occur near to your home.
  • Buy a map and take some time to learn the streets surrounding your home and your friends. Knowing more than one route to and from any location will help you avoid potential road blocks or protests.
  • Keep vehicles fully fuelled at all times and store extra petrol in a safe place if possible.
  • Register with you Embassy and know the emergency contact details.

 

And finally…

  • Have a backup plan and share it with a trusted friend.
  • Think: In case of an emergency – and you decide to leave Cairo – how would you do it and where would you go?
  • Road routes to the Sinai are expected to be closed. Major ports like Alexandria and Suez are expected to be as volatile as Cairo.
  • If flying be prepared for long waits at the airport and limited support staff and services. Take extra food and water with you and expect flights to be full. Have an onward journey plan should tickets to your preferred place to touchdown be unavailable.
  • If you do decide to evacuate make sure you let people know your planned departure time from home or office and your intended route.

 

 


Edited by ॐ, 22 June 2013 - 07:58 AM.

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#3 Ihavequestions

Ihavequestions

    Platinum Member



Posted 22 June 2013 - 09:01 AM

The thing is, Blah Blah, reporting from Cairo about Cairo is not OMG OMG living in Mahalla, which officially separated from the government and declared itself a Muslim Brotherhood-Free Zone months ago.

 

I've been back in the US since April. My sinuses were horribly infected, yet I was repeatedly misdiagnosed - even by a for real "specialist." That, of course, and the lack of security and constant disruptions that rip away any hope for a shred of stability:  no police protection, no police directing traffic, no police investigating crimes, no police other than administrative staff doing their job/s and that's it. So! President Morsi decides to give everybody the right to make a citizen's arrest, which is fine except for an environment where some dolt would throw you under a bus to make a good name for himself or receive some kind of gratuity or whatever their motivation might be, and turn you in as a spy - probably Israeli. Don't get me started about the electricity/water outages (which are at this very moment leaving large areas without for daaaaaaays) or being downwind in a taxi when they've let loose with tear gas.

 

Livvy, I told you before, next comes the Bloody Revolution and beards will be targets. I believe this is where we will see it; people are tired of listening to their mouths and they will be booted, just like the police.

 

One last thing, during the Revolution the going rate to get through the gates at Cairo International Airport was $2,000.00 (USD).

 

 

 

 


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#4 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 22 June 2013 - 09:37 AM

A lot of news lately has been talking about the call for violence by the opposition but the only ones I see saying that are the ones with beards because they fear it.  The opposition have been saying they'll be peaceful.  Of course the Les Miserable segment on The Program doesn't help the non-bloody revolution image.  LOL!

 

I saw your link on fb for How to Store Water Long Term.  I'm including it here.

 

I really hope it doesn't come to a bloody revolution but you may be right IHQ.  I forgot to mention one other thing that has happened recently.  The Sinai Pennisula went on high alert. Source  Curfews were put into place on the cities there.  They discovered an AQ bunker in the desert.  Recently AQ terrorists were the ones that captured the 7 Egyptian Military men.  These recent AQ militants were heavily armed and said they'd been smuggled through the Gaza tunnels and set up camp in the desert because they planned to join the June 30th revolution to oust Morsi.  I thought WTH?  Why would they want to oust Morsi?  Wouldn't they be pro-Morsi?

 

It was explained to me that believe it or not the MB is considered moderate and for that the more right groups consider Morsi an infidel. That this is one of the problems of inserting religion into a democracy.  There is always going to be someone more right, more extreme, to come in and say in the name of God or Allah that you're an infidel and not leading life according to God's law.  That's why AQ is there.  They're trained fighters who've seen battle and they want Egypt to descend into chaos and bloody civil war because they're going to fight for the more radical elements that want control of the country so they can fully institute an Islamic State in the largest Arab Country in the world.  It comes full circle.  It started with the MB and now it comes back to the MB.

 

Some in security sectors have recently said that when Morsi cut ties with Syria to back Egyptian Islamists who wanted to go fight in the war in Syria that he openly condoned violence in the name of religion.  That while his message was intended for a domestic audience when he implied that they won't prosecute militants who fight in the war in Syria it became a call to militants everywhere in MENA to come to Egypt as a safe haven.  There's talk that's been generating on other sites since the election when the MB won that Egypt is the great prize, the next radical Islamic State in the largest Arab populated country in the world.  They want to fight for that.  As Egypt goes...so goes the rest...


Edited by ॐ, 22 June 2013 - 09:41 AM.

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#5 Ihavequestions

Ihavequestions

    Platinum Member



Posted 22 June 2013 - 11:23 AM

The ones with beards have only been out in the open for a short while. During Egypt's BabaMu phase, those guys lived either in prison or in the closet. Many of them, particularly in the desert, are imported and/or refugees who lack the money/baksheesh and/or relationships/wasta to obtain the necessary paperwork to get into the cities, so the area is full of peeved, disenfranchised guys and they sure can't go back home.

 

People aren't the only thing smuggled into the country and I'm pretty sure my neighborhood was chok full of nasty weaponry; the military (at any of the kajillion check points to get from any point to another) regularly confiscate guns and ammunition, not to mention other ... stuff of the same ilk. 

 

There isn't going to be any civil war, though. Certainly not as we would think of it. Instead, there will be a bunch of killing, then revenge killing, with a couple of martyrs from families who need the money. Although it's a violent culture, it's not a nation of warriors. 

 

Morsi will resign. He's not the right guy for the job. His strengths lie elsewhere, as do the MB's, and he knows it. This may appear quite ignorant and I don't mean it to be, but, for the life of me, I cannot understand why a nation that is 90% Muslim has such a beef with Islam.


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#6 zahrasalem

zahrasalem

    Senior Member

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip


Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:24 PM

A lot has happened since I posted this. 

 

First, officials of the Tamarod petition have claimed to have collected well over the 15 million signatures to take the confidence away from the elected President.  Source

 

In a move seen as a desperate attempt to solidify his power over the cities of the opposition strongholds President Morsi appointed controversial governors:  Source   Protests broke out across Egypt because of it, but the appointment of the governor to Luxor was perhaps the most disturbing. To date the appointed governor has not agreed to resign despite being locked out of his office and the general uproar.  LINK

 

Somewhere in there the US Ambassador to Cairo came under fire for comments made about the scheduled June 30th protests.  Source  

 

The Egyptian President hastily launched an online PR campaign to defend his Presidency and document his first year in office in order to be more transparent. LINK and LINK  Hey, it's a new democracy.

 

Then yesterday June 21st the pro-Morsi counter-demonstrations were held.  Some estimated that tens of thousands showed up while other reports say up to one hundred thousand protesters came out.  They bused in people from all over Egypt.  LINK  When the protests are isolated to one or two cities I wouldn't use the headline "Egypt Explodes with Protesters".  Anyways, a bigger indication of unrest was seen earlier in the week in multiple cities across Egypt when protests broke out because of the new governors that were appointed by the President. One very good point that was brought up by Egyptians quoted in the media was, "Why doesn't Egypt also hold elections for governors and mayors so the people can have who they want to represent them from their own area; instead of doing things the old way which is just like the old regime?"

 

On the same day as the June 21st protests John Stewart appeared on Bassam Youssef's show "The Program" in Cairo.  This was the best link I've found and includes the 20 minute video segment which is in mostly English on their website article.  LINK  The segment was pre-taped and aired that Friday perhaps giving a nod to the escalating local current events. In Stewart's words, "Because we Americans don't know what's going on in the world."  biggrin.png

 

The Egypt Airport is on high alert for the 30th June protest.  Link  From June 28th until July 1st.

 

And if you experienced the first revolution this may sound like old news but if you're in Egypt for June 30th, which I know some of you are visiting your family there, below is a quick list of "just in case" measures to take provided by the online Expat Communities for Cairo.  Hopefully you check in between the rolling electrical blackouts before the 30th.

 

This second earth quake in Egypt on June 30th may be larger than the first earthquake in Egypt Jan 25th.

 

 

 

 

This is Zahra's husband Ahmed replying...........regarding the quoted "list" of things to do to prepare............

  • Alcohol if you drink it. Stocking up on Sakkara or some wine in advance of Ramadan is the norm here anyway so just do it earlier than planned.

is this advice for the 90% Muslim population??????   Yes, i'm Muslim and lived in Egypt all my life until I immigrated in 2010


Edited by zahrasalem, 23 June 2013 - 01:26 PM.

  • 0
01-04-09 - Married in Egyptian Embassy - Qatar - honeymoon in Egypt (Ahmed's home country)
05-04-09 - I-130 Sent

12-13-09 - INTERVIEW PASSED (Qatar)....Spent 12 weeks in AP
03-03-10 - VISA IN HAND :)
03-06-10 - AHMED COMES HOME :)

03-12-10 - SS# card received
03-19-10 - GC received
05-15-10 - First job
06-01-11 - Better job!
03-2012 - Started our business


Removal of Conditions/10 yr GC
02-15-12 - Sent I-175 ROC
07-17-12 - approved!....card production ordered!!!!
07-21-12 - 10 yr card arrived in mail :)


03-2013 - Apply for Naturalization

#7 zahrasalem

zahrasalem

    Senior Member

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip


Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:32 PM

 

 

One last thing, during the Revolution the going rate to get through the gates at Cairo International Airport was $2,000.00 (USD).

 

 

 

 

 

this is Ahmed, Zahra's husband replying..........are you Egyptian?  Exactly who was collecting this 60,000 LE at the gates at the airport?  And who were they collecting it from , other Egyptians?  or westerners?  Did you actually pay 60,000 LE to get into the airport? 


  • 0
01-04-09 - Married in Egyptian Embassy - Qatar - honeymoon in Egypt (Ahmed's home country)
05-04-09 - I-130 Sent

12-13-09 - INTERVIEW PASSED (Qatar)....Spent 12 weeks in AP
03-03-10 - VISA IN HAND :)
03-06-10 - AHMED COMES HOME :)

03-12-10 - SS# card received
03-19-10 - GC received
05-15-10 - First job
06-01-11 - Better job!
03-2012 - Started our business


Removal of Conditions/10 yr GC
02-15-12 - Sent I-175 ROC
07-17-12 - approved!....card production ordered!!!!
07-21-12 - 10 yr card arrived in mail :)


03-2013 - Apply for Naturalization

#8 zahrasalem

zahrasalem

    Senior Member

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:43 PM

 

this is Ahmed, Zahra's husband replying..........are you Egyptian?  Exactly who was collecting this 60,000 LE at the gates at the airport?  And who were they collecting it from , other Egyptians?  or westerners?  Did you actually pay 60,000 LE to get into the airport? 

 

 

 

sorry, 12,000 LE......still, not pocket change for anyone


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#9 Ihavequestions

Ihavequestions

    Platinum Member



Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:49 PM

 

this is Ahmed, Zahra's husband replying..........are you Egyptian?  Exactly who was collecting this 60,000 LE at the gates at the airport?  And who were they collecting it from , other Egyptians?  or westerners?  Did you actually pay 60,000 LE to get into the airport? 

 

I'm not Egyptian.

Are you asking for names?

Westerners.

I never said that.


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#10 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:14 AM

This is Zahra's husband Ahmed replying...........regarding the quoted "list" of things to do to prepare............

  • Alcohol if you drink it. Stocking up on Sakkara or some wine in advance of Ramadan is the norm here anyway so just do it earlier than planned.

is this advice for the 90% Muslim population??????   Yes, i'm Muslim and lived in Egypt all my life until I immigrated in 2010

 

The list is provided for Expats in Egypt and I linked the source above the quoted information.  The rest of it could also apply to Egyptians.  Use your discrimination.  Take what you need from it and leave what doesn't apply.


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#11 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:43 AM

The ones with beards have only been out in the open for a short while. During Egypt's BabaMu phase, those guys lived either in prison or in the closet. Many of them, particularly in the desert, are imported and/or refugees who lack the money/baksheesh and/or relationships/wasta to obtain the necessary paperwork to get into the cities, so the area is full of peeved, disenfranchised guys and they sure can't go back home.

 

People aren't the only thing smuggled into the country and I'm pretty sure my neighborhood was chok full of nasty weaponry; the military (at any of the kajillion check points to get from any point to another) regularly confiscate guns and ammunition, not to mention other ... stuff of the same ilk. 

 

There isn't going to be any civil war, though. Certainly not as we would think of it. Instead, there will be a bunch of killing, then revenge killing, with a couple of martyrs from families who need the money. Although it's a violent culture, it's not a nation of warriors. 

 

Morsi will resign. He's not the right guy for the job. His strengths lie elsewhere, as do the MB's, and he knows it. This may appear quite ignorant and I don't mean it to be, but, for the life of me, I cannot understand why a nation that is 90% Muslim has such a beef with Islam.

 

A year ago when I saw it was down to the Muslim Brotherhood Candidate or the Old Mubarak Regime Candidate I knew it would have to be the Muslim Brotherhood that would win the Presidency if it was to be a legitimate democratic election because the protesters in the revolution wouldn't go back to the old regime. 

 

After it was announced that Morsi won the Presidency I turned to my husband and I asked him, "What if the Muslim Brotherhood doesn't keep their promises to the revolutionaries about including them?  People are saying the Muslim Brotherhood just want power to establish their own agenda."

 

He said, "Then the revolution isn't over.  You'll see.  People won't stand for it because they're not afraid anymore.  They will go back out into the street and fight to oust the Muslim Brotherhood."

 

Now here we are a year later and we saw this coming.  The Muslim Brotherhood did just like people said they would do and behaved not much differently than the old regime so now they're out.

 

He believed like much of the rest of the revolutionaries believed that the people that put you in power can take you out of power when you are not doing the people's will.  They gave the MB a trial run and the people watched them and remained politically involved and protested nearly every step of the way.  The Egyptians have been protesting so much that there are 2 protests an hour.  They were screaming and shouting until their faces turned blue because they felt they weren't being heard by the government they appointed.  They've felt disenfranchised and run over and now they're done talking.  Game over.  They don't recognize the new constitution, they don't recognize the sweeping executive powers the president gave himself to appoint the parliament, they don't recognize the governors he's recently appointed, they don't recognize his legitimacy.

 

If only the President and his administration had listened and worked with the protesters, and not just the Islamists, instead of ignoring the protesters and excluding them nearly every step of the way this all could have been avoided.  I don't see any good way out of this June 30th protests.  The factories in Mahallah are shutting down and organizing with the other factories across the country to strike.

 

I asked my husband what's going to happen June 30th and like you IHQ he said that Morsi will have to step down for the sake of the country and for the sake of keeping the institution of the Muslim Brotherhood intact.  That they don't care about the position of power like the Presidency as much as they care about keeping the Muslim Brotherhood from fracturing and being seen as illegitimate.  

 

With Ramadan just 10 days from the 30th of June if this carries on as long or longer than Tahrir Square did it will be interesting to see what happens.  If it remains a peaceful sit in across the country bringing it to a stand still, or if it breaks out into sectarian violence, or if this ends even more quickly and peacefully than the last one, or if it's a total over-hyped flop similar to the last two protests since the revolution that didn't amount to much else.


Edited by ॐ, 24 June 2013 - 03:44 AM.

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#12 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 24 June 2013 - 09:44 PM

Security Message to U.S. Citizens No. 48: Embassy Closed on Sunday June 30th
 
In anticipation of demonstrations that may turn violent, the U.S. Embassy will be closed to the public on June 30th. The U.S. Embassy will continue monitor conditions and announce decisions regarding its operating status.
 
As potentially violent protest activity may occur before June 30th, U.S. citizens are advised to maintain a low profile and restrict movement to the immediate area of their residences and neighborhoods starting on June 28. U.S. citizens should monitor announcements from the U.S. Embassy and local media in order to stay current with the situation. As the security situation is particularly unpredictable, please ensure you possess the necessary items should it be necessary to remain at home for an extended period.
 
Due to a report that opposition groups plan to solicit signatures at sixteen Cairo Metro stations on the morning of June 25, the U.S. Embassy is advising its personnel to utilize other transportation means. Though violence is not expected in connection with soliciting signatures, it is possible that confrontations between individuals involved and opposing groups could become violent.
 
As a matter of general practice, U.S. citizens should avoid areas where large gatherings may occur. Even demonstrations or events intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and possibly escalate into violence. U.S. citizens in Egypt are urged to monitor local news reports and to plan their activities accordingly.
 
The Embassy reminds U.S. citizens to review their personal security plans and remain alert to their surroundings at all times in Egypt.  For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State’s Internet website where the Worldwide Caution,  Country Specific Information for Egypt,Travel Warnings, and Travel Alerts, can be found.  Follow us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook, and download our free Smart Traveler App, available through iTunes or Google Play to have travel information at your fingertips. 
 
 
Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the United States and Canada, or, for callers outside of the United States and Canada, on a regular toll-line at 1-202-501-4444.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). 
 
 
U.S. citizens are advised to maintain valid travel documents and enroll with the Department of State or the U.S. Embassy Cairo through the State Department’s Smart Traveler Enrollment Program website.  If you enroll we can keep you up to date with important safety and security announcements and can also help your family and friends get in touch with you in an emergency.  U.S. citizens without Internet access may enroll directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. 
 
 
For further information, U.S. citizens may call the Embassy’s American Citizens Services Unit at 2797-2301 during business hours, Sunday to Thursday from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.  Please refer to the American Citizens Services Facebook page at:  www.facebook.com/USEmbassyCairoACS.  For emergencies after business hours and on weekends and holidays, U.S. citizens can contact the Embassy Duty Officer via the Embassy switchboard at 2797-3300.  The Embassy is located at 5 Tawfik Diab Street (formerly known as Latin America Street), Garden City, Cairo.

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#13 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 26 June 2013 - 05:21 AM

This is the latest on the first series of the demonstrations the Tamarod group is holding this week.  It started on June 25th with them taking petitions to 16 metro stations.  You get to see the people who are petitioning for Tamarod and hear in their own words in this video what they have to say as the English subtitles are provided.

 

 

This is the article the video was included in.  VIDEO: Anti-Morsi activists take Egypt's 'Rebel' signature drive underground

 

More about the issues they address can be read about in Egyptians Resist 'Brotherhoodization'.  It's one of the more articulate pieces I've read that explains five points about the brotherhood's political strategy since being in office and why the people are mobilizing against them.

 

It's written by: 

Ambassador Nassif Hitti who is a senior Arab League official and the former head of the Arab League Mission in Paris.  He is a former representative to UNESCO and a member of the Al-Monitor board of directors.  The views he presents here are his alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of these organizations.
 

He starts off with:

Since its accession to power in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood has adopted a policy of exclusion rather than inclusion 
in the building of the post-revolution regime. It wants to shape Egyptian society according to its own conception of Islam.

 

Then he goes into detailed explanation of how they are doing this by organizing it into five points.

 

First, on the administration level.
Second, on the judiciary level.
Third, on the level of the Ministry of Culture.
Fourth, on the education level.
Fifth, on other levels, the attempt to control the Al-Azhar institution, which is the key obstacle to their Brotherhoodization policy.

 

 

I also came across another article that explains what the brotherhood is doing and why they're doing it.  From George Jonas: Egypt’s democracy dilemma.
 
When one refers to "Morsi's presidency," one should be aware that his presidency is the de facto Muslim Brotherhood's, led by its Mourshid (Supreme Guide), Mr. Mohammed Badie. You may or may not be aware, but this Islamist group is a Mafia-like movement which, following numerous setbacks over the years,  is now spreading like a cancer.  
It's primary goal is to turn Egypt into an Islamist country ruled by the 'shariah'; its ultimate goal is to create a larger, stronger Islamist Nation ("El Oummah El Islamia") with a "khalifah" at its head. Guided by such a vision, all presidential decisions are aimed to spread the Islamist ideology and eliminate whatever could be precieved as western 
or un-Islamic lifestyle and culture."
 
 
There are solutions to some of the issues in Egypt but they're not getting heard because it's not inline with the current administrations agenda.  For example here is another solution being offered in recent weeks by Egyptians and for Egyptians addressing the crumbling educational system.  
 

Edited by ॐ, 26 June 2013 - 05:22 AM.

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#14 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 26 June 2013 - 05:42 AM

And awesome!  This was the sustainable solution I was mentioning in previous posts in this thread. 

 

 

 

Published on May 1, 2013

Egypt's fuel and energy problems are increasing at an alarming rate, but the solution may lie in one the country's most abundant resources - the sun. 

With electricity blackouts and fuel shortages becoming all to common, a group of young Egyptians believe the answer is to go green.

Ice Cairo have drawn on the 40 years worth of experience of solar power expert Adel Hanna to develop a low cost solar powered water heater that brings hot water into your home with no electricity - and crucially, no electrical bills.

What's more, they want to spread this knowledge. On what they call 'Solar Hackathons', they teach others how to construct the water heaters - created using local materials at an affordable cost. 

At this Hackathon, the Ice Cairo team went to the 'Deep South' camp in Marsa Allam to give a workshop. They hope that having a functioning working model there will encourage other camps and hotels - as well as local bedouins - to make the switch to solar power. 

Video by Simon Hanna

With thanks to Ice Cairo: http://icecairo.com/

And Deep South camp, who will be showcasing the solar heater during the '3al Ganoob' festival: http://on.fb.me/17wcl1A

 

 

 


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#15 Dr. A ♥ O

Dr. A ♥ O

Posted 28 June 2013 - 01:12 PM

It all comes together now.  I'd been puzzled for awhile over the description of the opposition being fractured.  This opinion article written for the Christian Science Monitor by a law professor at Georgetown University is the missing puzzle piece I've been looking for.  Now I can see fully the larger picture and it solidifies in my mind the dilemma that was faced and why the revolution wasn't over yet.  

 

Those who fought for the revolution were fractured in the elections because the military cracked down on them for bringing the instability in the country and thus put the leaders and the organizers in jail so they couldn't continue to participate; which left the majority of people with only two options to choose from and neither of which they really wanted.

 

Be inclusive, Morsi, or you may face a second Egyptian revolution

 

After the fall of Mr. Mubarak, who was an Air Force general, the military retained power through a junta of other generals. The generals retained Mubarak’s dreaded security police and their well-documented reliance on torture. The junta arrested bloggers and other activists for non-violent dissent, such as “insulting” the regime, and gave them long prison sentences in sham military courts.
 
Curiously, however, the military focused its repression almost entirely on secular democrats: It released Islamists from prison and allowed them to operate freely. The Muslim Brotherhood, in turn, avoided criticizing the military and refused to support calls to hold it accountable for its human rights abuses.
 
With many of their organizers in jail, the secular democrats were ill-equipped to compete in the country’s first post-Mubarak presidential election last June. The junta, however, took no chances, barring all pro-Western secular democrats from the ballot through its appointed election commission. Morsi was elected because Egyptian voters preferred him to yet another Air Force general. But the generals denied voters plausible alternatives to military or Islamist rule.

 

 

Also massive demonstrations are going on today, June 28th.  Many news reports and social media activity show Egypt is burning and blood is being shed.  The boiling point has been reached.


Edited by ॐ, 28 June 2013 - 01:14 PM.

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