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Sara & Mark

How many Citizenship's can one person have?

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My wife is an Iranian citizen by birth and a Swedish citizen by naturalization, she is currently residing in Sweden.

She will be residing with me in the USA when her Immigrant Visa (I-130) is finalized and therefore eligible to become an American citizen after meeting the requirements.

I am a Canadian citizen by Birth, and an American citizen by naturalization.

My parents were born in the UK, so I therefore have birth rights to become a British citizen.

How many citizenship's can one person have?

Is the number of citizenship's based on agreements between individual countries?

Is the Department of State the best agency to contact regarding this?

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My wife is an Iranian citizen by birth and a Swedish citizen by naturalization, she is currently residing in Sweden.

She will be residing with me in the USA when her Immigrant Visa (I-130) is finalized and therefore eligible to become an American citizen after meeting the requirements.

I am a Canadian citizen by Birth, and an American citizen by naturalization.

My parents were born in the UK, so I therefore have birth rights to become a British citizen.

How many citizenship's can one person have?

Is the number of citizenship's based on agreements between individual countries?

Is the Department of State the best agency to contact regarding this?

You can be a citizen of many countries without a limit as long as those countries allow/recognize that. So it depends on those countries citizenship laws.

Regarding the US, the Department of State "recognizes that multi-citizenship exists." So they are OK with it, though not very happy if you read the wording carefully. In a nutshell, according to the US you can hold passports of different countries, no problem. However, for the US you are officially a US citizen only (regardless whatever other passports you carry) and hence, you need to leave and enter the US with a US passport.

Edited by nwctzn

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There is no firm number- most countries either allow dual (and multiple) citizenships, or they do not (Japan doesn't, for example). I currently hold three citizenships (Swiss by birth, Irish by naturalisation due to living there, and US by marriage/ living there), and so do my kids (by parents/ where they were born).

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Wife has three, was born in Colombia, has family there, and with born in Colombia on her US passport, won't let her in unless she has a Colombian passport.

She became naturalized in Venezuela when the economy was good, for all practicable purposes, that is like living in Hudson, WI and working in St. Paul, just across the river. Since she owns property in Venezuela, only way she can keep it is to maintain her Venezuelan Citizenship. We would like to sell it and cut all ties with Venezuela, but can't even take a dime out of Venezuela. So just sitting tight and waiting to see what happens. In the meantime, she has to maintain her Venezuelan citizenship or lose her property.

She also worked in Venezuela for 25 years and is fully eligible for their SS benefits that could pay a small part of our property taxes, would lose that as well if she didn't maintain her Venezuelan citizenship. But sure a lot of red tape to get that little bit of money.

She is a US citizen by choice, been working here for eight years, and paying taxes. When we first met, didn't make any difference to me where I lived, but she wanted to come here. Is kind of a pain in the butt to maintain three different passports, not bad for the US passport, quite a long trip to these consulates.

Could say her Venezuelan passport is by choice, her property is worth over $300,000 at the so called fair exchange rate. With Colombia, our DOS says she has to have the Colombian passport with their agreement with them, just so she can visit her family. Most of her family cannot visit us, to get a visa, have to be super rich.

Went around in circles with our DOS about having to maintain her Colombian passport, that was extremely expensive for us, just cannot fill out simple forms, must be done by what that call a notary, an attorney here. Our DOS does not like the term, dual citizenship, prefers dual naturalization, a bunch of hypocrites in my opinion. She had no choice as to where she was born. Also because her US passport says born in Colombia, she was already strip searched twice when coming back because of that Colombian drug problem. Really tees me off.

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You can be a citizen of many countries without a limit as long as those countries allow/recognize that. So it depends on those countries citizenship laws.

Regarding the US, the Department of State "recognizes that multi-citizenship exists." So they are OK with it, though not very happy if you read the wording carefully. In a nutshell, according to the US you can hold passports of different countries, no problem. However, for the US you are officially a US citizen only (regardless whatever other passports you carry) and hence, you need to leave and enter the US with a US passport.

Thank you for the reply.

So, based on what you are telling me, and the fact that my wife is currently a Swedish and Iranian citizen, both of those countries are OK with being a citizen of many countries, correct?

And obviously the USA is OK with it due to the fact that I am both an American and Canadian citizen, correct?

With that being said, and if I understand correctly, my wife can be a Swedish, and Iranian, and American citizen.

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There is no firm number- most countries either allow dual (and multiple) citizenships, or they do not (Japan doesn't, for example). I currently hold three citizenships (Swiss by birth, Irish by naturalisation due to living there, and US by marriage/ living there), and so do my kids (by parents/ where they were born).

Thank you, I respect you input as I have seen you reply to numerous posts on this forum.

My wife's situation is, or will soon be, a mirror or yours with only the country names being the difference.

If a country allows dual, do they also automatically allow multiple? If that is the case then I see no issues with my wife becoming an American citizen and maintaining the other two. Unless it is a case of "only" single, "only" dual, or multiple?

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Multiple citizenship always requires that all players get along. Like the United States, the Islamic Republic of Iran does not recognize any other citizenship of its citizens. But unlike the U.S., Iran is known of keeping Americans hostage to serve Allah and the Ayatollah. Torturing an Iranian who also is a US citizen promises also a greater reward, and such a person can be easily manipulated under the thread of bodily harm or death to a loved one.

Know that whoever dies with the most citizenships doesn't win anything.

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Multiple citizenship always requires that all players get along. Like the United States, the Islamic Republic of Iran does not recognize any other citizenship of its citizens. But unlike the U.S., Iran is known of keeping Americans hostage to serve Allah and the Ayatollah. Torturing an Iranian who also is a US citizen promises also a greater reward, and such a person can be easily manipulated under the thread of bodily harm or death to a loved one.

Know that whoever dies with the most citizenships doesn't win anything.

Nor does the United States recognize my Canadian citizenship, but that doesn't prevent me from being a citizen of both countries.

My question was "How many citizenship's can one person have?"

It was not my intention to start a political or religious debate and I'll not let this thread come to that either, so I'll refrain from further comment, respect your input to my original question, and leave it at that.

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If you have no desire to travel, one citizenship is enough. If you have benefits or own property in a foreign country and can't get your benefits nor property value out of it, only choice is to lose that value or to maintain that citizenship.

If you have family you want to visit, and our Department of State made an agreement with that country that you must have a passport for that country, only choices is to maintain that citizenship or never see your family again.

DOS position on this subject is don't ask don't tell, but does leave you in a rather awkward position. We are hoping and praying that something will happen in Venezuela so that country will be friendly with the USA again, so we can sell our property and get the hell out of there. If our DOS removes that place of birth off of my wife's US passport, will no longer have to maintain that citizenship either. I have no problems going to Colombia, my place of birth is in Chicago, wife sure does, her place of birth is in Bogota, they won't let her in.

Does your wife have family in Iran? If so, don't even show your US passport, but still have to carry that to get back to here. Now that they have chips in passports, can be read, do sell metal covers, but are also detected by metal detectors. So screwed either way.

Iran used to be our friends, my brother was stationed their and fell in love with an Iranian girl, but she obeyed the wishes of her father. Ironically, after all these years, my brother still talks about that. In like manner, Venezuela use to be our friends, damned governments can really screw us over. I get along well with Venezuelans, we are the people, but our governments can't get along. So we have to pay the price.

Also had a hell of a hard time getting my stepdaughter out of Venezuela, can't feed her, can't educate her, can't give her good health care, but they sure in the hell wanted to keep her. Friends are also having a difficult time adopting children from these third world countries, but you can still do with, with lots and lots of cash. Like $50,000.00, the latest a friend paid to give a child a decent life.

She cost me about $12,000, my view on this, can't even buy a decent car for this price, and if you do, will only last a couple of years. But here we are talking about a human life. Most of it went to corrupted government officials. We have those here too, but not nearly as bad, yet.

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Nor does the United States recognize my Canadian citizenship, but that doesn't prevent me from being a citizen of both countries.

My question was "How many citizenship's can one person have?"

It was not my intention to start a political or religious debate and I'll not let this thread come to that either, so I'll refrain from further comment, respect your input to my original question, and leave it at that.

Well-said!

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Depends on the separate countries.

I hold Australian and British nationality. I will (hopefully) come April apply for USC. Australia, the UK and the US have no problem with dual/multi citizenships so I will be fine.

You need to look at the rules for the specific countries to make sure getting one passport doesn't affect the others. Some children can be multi but then need to choose as an adult (and not realise it unless they actually looked into it).

As long as the countries don't have problems, having multiples is fine BUT bear in mind the rules of the individual countries like Brother Hezekial said. It could have impact you're not aware of yet. Also being a USC you need to file taxes on WORLDWIDE income so if you ever move out of the country you'll still need to file your taxes.

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One strict answer is that it cannot exceed 196. That is the current number of countries :whistle:

Well, knowing that about 46 of those countries don't play along, and that one usually needs to get married, immigrate, be a resident for an average of 5 years, I'd say if someone starts out with 3 citizenships, is a Jew to add number 4 quickly at age 18, and then adds a new one every 7 years (if he can afford millions in spousal support), I'd say 11 or 12 is probably the maximum possible, if somebody would dedicate his life to enter the Guiness Book of Records as the person who held the most citizenships in life.

I rather would try to break Mick Jagger's record of having sex with over 1,000 hot chicks . . .

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