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Do you think the consulate takes this in to consideration when making there decision. I know this is a touchy subject, but I have a friend who married an African-American woman and they denied them, and he knew of someone else that this happened too. I am curious if thing this is taking in to consideration becuase a lot of people that I know seems to think so. I am muslim and race doe snot matter, so I had totally forgot about this until my friend told me she was denied. (She is African-American.) I know this is probably going to be a nasty topic so please do not start I am just wondering becuase of the pattern that I have seen. No nasty comments and please do not take this the wrong way. I mean they are trying to find a reason to deny you, me and my fiance are the same age, same religion, same educational backgroud. But hte race is different and we meet through his cousin, so I tink these are my flags. I am not sure, please let me knwo what you think.

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I don't think you will be denied based on your race. If you have all the proof and its convincing then you should have no probelm. Make sure you have all your paperwork completed as well. I think when people recieve deniels its easier to say they denied because of this or that instead of looking for what possibly went wrong.

Red flags are what cause denials, however there are many people here who had red flags but hey came prepared all of them got their approvals. Good luck.

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Did the consulate actually tell your friend they were denied because of a racial difference or did your friend sense that's what it was about? I'm just asking because it seems SO RIDICULOUS to me that they would deny a petition for that reason that I can't even believe it. :o Lots of VJ couples have interracial and/or interfaith relationships and 99% (it seems) get the visa. Try not to worry about it too much -- but maybe come up with a really solid way to respond to a question about your racial differences, just in case, so he's prepared with something thoughtful to say to the CO :thumbs:

Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

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Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

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Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

I read something like this too, but on the page I read it says it's a red flag if the US citizen lives with the fiance's family or has known business ties to his family. i.e. a situation where the USC is somehow indebted to the fiance's family.

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Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

I have heard that it's best to not mention family of the beneficiary that reside in the U.S. unless you are specifically asked. Someone's case here in the MENA at one point involved a return to USCIS based on the consulate's belief that there was something fishy about the U.S. relatives and/or the way the couple met through these relatives. Anyone remember?

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I found that article I was referrring to, someone on VJ posted back in March

Here are the red flags that are mentioned that only affect the petioner, there are more that affect the beneficiary. (you were right Karen)

1. A very brief courtship followed by a plunge into matrimony;

2. A marriage ceremony arranged only a short time after petitioner arrives in the beneficiary’s country and they meet for the first time;

3. No common language;

4. Petitioner resides with family members of the beneficiary in the US;

5. Petitioner is employed by or has a business relationship with a relative of beneficiary;

6. Petitioner submits phone records that show he uses a residential phone number that is listed in the name of another person.

7. US divorce followed very quickly by an engagement to foreign beneficiary is often a red flag for consular officers.

8. There is little or no documentary evidence of the relationship prior to the actual engagement.

9. Long gaps of time between the petitioner & beneficiary being together in person.

10. Failure to disclose previous marriages;

11. Failure to disclose previous petitions filed on behalf of other beneficiaries.

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Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

I have heard that it's best to not mention family of the beneficiary that reside in the U.S. unless you are specifically asked. Someone's case here in the MENA at one point involved a return to USCIS based on the consulate's belief that there was something fishy about the U.S. relatives and/or the way the couple met through these relatives. Anyone remember?

That may all depend upon whether Private wrote how they met in the original petition, because if she did then the consulate already would know about his cousin and the circumstances of their meeting. In that case, her fiance' will just have to talk about how his cousin is close to both of them and how he thought they'd be a good match for XYZ reasons, etc.

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Yeah I heard that too, Jenn. That they may think the USC is being paid off or something. It seems you really gotta watch it with immigration.

I think you guys are right, I remember this because it's one of my red flags. He has a ton of family that live in my area and one of his cousins is married to my cousin, we learned of the marriage about 6 months after we met and it helped the whole trust issue alot.

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Yeah I heard that too, Jenn. That they may think the USC is being paid off or something. It seems you really gotta watch it with immigration.

I found what I was looking for. It was Morocco4Ever's experience, actually. Might be helpful...

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/index.ph...ost&p=74374

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I know of 2 people that the US citizen were African American, and they were denied, but then again I know of more that were caucasion that were denied as well. This leads me to think that it isn't based on race, but rather the "red flags".

I don't think you will be denied based on your race. If you have all the proof and its convincing then you should have no probelm. Make sure you have all your paperwork completed as well. I think when people recieve deniels its easier to say they denied because of this or that instead of looking for what possibly went wrong.

Red flags are what cause denials, however there are many people here who had red flags but hey came prepared all of them got their approvals. Good luck.

JP you haven't been around VJ long enough to remember, but there were several people in Morocco that had their cases returned to the CIS. I was one of them. My husband went into the interview fully prepared with tons of evidence, but the CO refused to look at it. Its interesting, once the CIS saw basically the same proof that the consulate refused to look at they reaffirmed our case.

Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

My husband was asked if he had relatives in the US. He told them he had a sister and an ex brother in law. The CO asked why his sister got a divorce and he told him that she wasn't divorced, the ex was from a different sister. Then the CO asked if the sister had arranged our marriage. It was obvious that the CO thought his sister came here on a fraud marriage and thought she was paying me to bring him over. BIG MISUNDERSTANDING! His sister is still married 3 years later to the man that petitioned her.

Although it was never brought up later when the told us the reason for the denial we to this day believe this is one of the reasons. I have never lived with his sister, nor have I even met face to face. I have, however talked to her on the phone a few times.

So yes, I do believe a relative in the US is one of the red flags they look for. It is important that you know what visa they came on, and have all info ready to address their situation. If all is on the up and up then you shouldn't have a problem with this one. I didn't have any proof of this at the interview, but then again they wouldn't have known since they never asked.

I hope this gives you a little more insight to prepare you for your interview.

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I know of 2 people that the US citizen were African American, and they were denied, but then again I know of more that were caucasion that were denied as well. This leads me to think that it isn't based on race, but rather the "red flags".

I don't think you will be denied based on your race. If you have all the proof and its convincing then you should have no probelm. Make sure you have all your paperwork completed as well. I think when people recieve deniels its easier to say they denied because of this or that instead of looking for what possibly went wrong.

Red flags are what cause denials, however there are many people here who had red flags but hey came prepared all of them got their approvals. Good luck.

JP you haven't been around VJ long enough to remember, but there were several people in Morocco that had their cases returned to the CIS. I was one of them. My husband went into the interview fully prepared with tons of evidence, but the CO refused to look at it. Its interesting, once the CIS saw basically the same proof that the consulate refused to look at they reaffirmed our case.

Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

My husband was asked if he had relatives in the US. He told them he had a sister and an ex brother in law. The CO asked why his sister got a divorce and he told him that she wasn't divorced, the ex was from a different sister. Then the CO asked if the sister had arranged our marriage. It was obvious that the CO thought his sister came here on a fraud marriage and thought she was paying me to bring him over. BIG MISUNDERSTANDING! His sister is still married 3 years later to the man that petitioned her.

Although it was never brought up later when the told us the reason for the denial we to this day believe this is one of the reasons. I have never lived with his sister, nor have I even met face to face. I have, however talked to her on the phone a few times.

So yes, I do believe a relative in the US is one of the red flags they look for. It is important that you know what visa they came on, and have all info ready to address their situation. If all is on the up and up then you shouldn't have a problem with this one. I didn't have any proof of this at the interview, but then again they wouldn't have known since they never asked.

I hope this gives you a little more insight to prepare you for your interview.

I actually do remember all the details of your case. I think I was here when it happened, I joined in February. I remember for awhile they were denying people left and right out of Morocco.

I am slightly concerned about that red flag, but not very much since we are both arabic and its not uncommon to be hooked up in our culture. I think Jordan is alot more lenient than other embassies that I have seen on here. We do have a few red flags but I think everything else outweights that. In anycase, I have no issue living in Jordan if we got denied. I have a HUGE family there and it would just fine with me. :star:

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I know of 2 people that the US citizen were African American, and they were denied, but then again I know of more that were caucasion that were denied as well. This leads me to think that it isn't based on race, but rather the "red flags".

I don't think you will be denied based on your race. If you have all the proof and its convincing then you should have no probelm. Make sure you have all your paperwork completed as well. I think when people recieve deniels its easier to say they denied because of this or that instead of looking for what possibly went wrong.

Red flags are what cause denials, however there are many people here who had red flags but hey came prepared all of them got their approvals. Good luck.

JP you haven't been around VJ long enough to remember, but there were several people in Morocco that had their cases returned to the CIS. I was one of them. My husband went into the interview fully prepared with tons of evidence, but the CO refused to look at it. Its interesting, once the CIS saw basically the same proof that the consulate refused to look at they reaffirmed our case.

Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

My husband was asked if he had relatives in the US. He told them he had a sister and an ex brother in law. The CO asked why his sister got a divorce and he told him that she wasn't divorced, the ex was from a different sister. Then the CO asked if the sister had arranged our marriage. It was obvious that the CO thought his sister came here on a fraud marriage and thought she was paying me to bring him over. BIG MISUNDERSTANDING! His sister is still married 3 years later to the man that petitioned her.

Although it was never brought up later when the told us the reason for the denial we to this day believe this is one of the reasons. I have never lived with his sister, nor have I even met face to face. I have, however talked to her on the phone a few times.

So yes, I do believe a relative in the US is one of the red flags they look for. It is important that you know what visa they came on, and have all info ready to address their situation. If all is on the up and up then you shouldn't have a problem with this one. I didn't have any proof of this at the interview, but then again they wouldn't have known since they never asked.

I hope this gives you a little more insight to prepare you for your interview.

I actually do remember all the details of your case. I think I was here when it happened, I joined in February. I remember for awhile they were denying people left and right out of Morocco.

I am slightly concerned about that red flag, but not very much since we are both arabic and its not uncommon to be hooked up in our culture. I think Jordan is alot more lenient than other embassies that I have seen on here. We do have a few red flags but I think everything else outweights that. In anycase, I have no issue living in Jordan if we got denied. I have a HUGE family there and it would just fine with me. :star:

February was the tail end of the big returns, although we keep having stragglers. Ours was returned on 8/24/05, so it has been over a year.

I do remember your situation now. If that is your only red flag then you should be able to overcome it, but I wouldn't be a bit surprised if they brought it up. From what I have seen Jordan is a much better run consulate, but slow.

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I know of 2 people that the US citizen were African American, and they were denied, but then again I know of more that were caucasion that were denied as well. This leads me to think that it isn't based on race, but rather the "red flags".

I don't think you will be denied based on your race. If you have all the proof and its convincing then you should have no probelm. Make sure you have all your paperwork completed as well. I think when people recieve deniels its easier to say they denied because of this or that instead of looking for what possibly went wrong.

Red flags are what cause denials, however there are many people here who had red flags but hey came prepared all of them got their approvals. Good luck.

JP you haven't been around VJ long enough to remember, but there were several people in Morocco that had their cases returned to the CIS. I was one of them. My husband went into the interview fully prepared with tons of evidence, but the CO refused to look at it. Its interesting, once the CIS saw basically the same proof that the consulate refused to look at they reaffirmed our case.

Also, I personally think that the fact that his cousin introduced you actually strengthens your case -- it shows that his family thinks you two make a good match and that they support your marriage :yes: which I hear can be a BIG plus in some interviews.

This is something I have been quite concerned with myself. I read somewhere on some government website that this can be a red flag. I met my fiance in a similar situation and sometimes it can work against you because they can say that their family paid you off or something. I guess that with other red flags can be a problem.

Does anyone know anything else about this?

My husband was asked if he had relatives in the US. He told them he had a sister and an ex brother in law. The CO asked why his sister got a divorce and he told him that she wasn't divorced, the ex was from a different sister. Then the CO asked if the sister had arranged our marriage. It was obvious that the CO thought his sister came here on a fraud marriage and thought she was paying me to bring him over. BIG MISUNDERSTANDING! His sister is still married 3 years later to the man that petitioned her.

Although it was never brought up later when the told us the reason for the denial we to this day believe this is one of the reasons. I have never lived with his sister, nor have I even met face to face. I have, however talked to her on the phone a few times.

So yes, I do believe a relative in the US is one of the red flags they look for. It is important that you know what visa they came on, and have all info ready to address their situation. If all is on the up and up then you shouldn't have a problem with this one. I didn't have any proof of this at the interview, but then again they wouldn't have known since they never asked.

I hope this gives you a little more insight to prepare you for your interview.

I actually do remember all the details of your case. I think I was here when it happened, I joined in February. I remember for awhile they were denying people left and right out of Morocco.

I am slightly concerned about that red flag, but not very much since we are both arabic and its not uncommon to be hooked up in our culture. I think Jordan is alot more lenient than other embassies that I have seen on here. We do have a few red flags but I think everything else outweights that. In anycase, I have no issue living in Jordan if we got denied. I have a HUGE family there and it would just fine with me. :star:

February was the tail end of the big returns, although we keep having stragglers. Ours was returned on 8/24/05, so it has been over a year.

I do remember your situation now. If that is your only red flag then you should be able to overcome it, but I wouldn't be a bit surprised if they brought it up. From what I have seen Jordan is a much better run consulate, but slow.

Well its not my only flag. We have a slight age difference and I'm divorced. However we have lots of pluses too, which I think outweigh everything else. Jordan is slow, but once you get in it seems to move quicker.

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