Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rkintn

Moving back to Russia ???

20 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

What if scenario !!!

My russian wife since Dec 10 -05 has her advanced parole and her G/C interview is not until Dec. 5 2006

What if she misses the interview and I move to Russia next year and after we are married

for 2 years we decide we want to move back to America , what are the consequences??? :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll start over from zero again. K3 route next time.

But this sounds like a bad idea since you will in essence be abandoning your AOS application just because you wanna do the "what if" thing. Don't know if the DOS or USCIS will look very favorably on it.

Not sure. Others will know better.

IMO, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to establish permanent residence in the US. I'd get her a ticket to come home for the interview if she's not here now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IMO, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to establish permanent residence in the US. I'd get her a ticket to come home for the interview if she's not here now.

Do what is right for your marriage. The green card will be fine in the end either way, it just might take longer. The biggest problem is that you will lose the AP as soon as the AOS is denied. As long as you are both still married, I can't see it being a problem trying the AOS again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I move to Russia next year and after we are married.
What will your legal status be in Russia? Business visas each year? To get temporary or permanent residency in Russia is a rather complicated processes but can be done if you need to stay for years at a time. You even get a work permit and chance at citizenship :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I move to Russia next year and after we are married.
What will your legal status be in Russia? Business visas each year? To get temporary or permanent residency in Russia is a rather complicated processes but can be done if you need to stay for years at a time. You even get a work permit and chance at citizenship :P

for now I would just use my 1 year business visa that i have renewed for the third time

but like you say the others can be done . just depends on how it goes the first year ...

I am no expert but i believe after I live out of the USA for a few months that i can file

DCF in Moscow after we have 2 years of marriage and recieve a greencard on the spot.

We'll see ... :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I move to Russia next year and after we are married.
What will your legal status be in Russia? Business visas each year? To get temporary or permanent residency in Russia is a rather complicated processes but can be done if you need to stay for years at a time. You even get a work permit and chance at citizenship :P

for now I would just use my 1 year business visa that i have renewed for the third time

but like you say the others can be done . just depends on how it goes the first year ...

I am no expert but i believe after I live out of the USA for a few months that i can file

DCF in Moscow after we have 2 years of marriage and recieve a greencard on the spot.

We'll see ... :blink:

You've got it right, as of today. If you've been resident in Russia for 6+ months, you can file w/USCIS Field Office there and go straight thru to the Immigrant Visa application. Allow at least 6 months for processing (before you want to move to the US).

I agree with "do what is best for your marriage". If this is the right thing for you two, have a great adventure!

Just take some of the relevant paperwork with you for the eventual filings and keep the I-864 and domicile principles in mind (file your tax returns, vote, keep US banking & ties etc). The DCF Guide has some links on the topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you've been resident in Russia for 6+ months, you can file w/USCIS Field Office there and go straight thru to the Immigrant Visa application.
I wonder how the Embassy in Moscow defines resident? If resident means establishing official Russian residency then that means you have to go through the complicated processes of using a private visa invite and applying for permanent residency in Russia, getting approved 6 months later and re-entering Russia again. I have inquired about this processes as a way to circumvent the expensive business visa invitation, but the processes is so complicated it is not worth doing unless you have no choice. But if 6 months means having a business visa for 6 months then that might be the fastest way to a green card.

Also does your wife have to be a resident of Moscow as well?

Again, it is very hard to get a "propiska" for a Russian in Moscow. Most Russians in Moscow are not registered or official residents of Moscow!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you've been resident in Russia for 6+ months, you can file w/USCIS Field Office there and go straight thru to the Immigrant Visa application.
I wonder how the Embassy in Moscow defines resident? If resident means establishing official Russian residency then that means you have to go through the complicated processes of using a private visa invite and applying for permanent residency in Russia, getting approved 6 months later and re-entering Russia again. I have inquired about this processes as a way to circumvent the expensive business visa invitation, but the processes is so complicated it is not worth doing unless you have no choice. But if 6 months means having a business visa for 6 months then that might be the fastest way to a green card.

Also does your wife have to be a resident of Moscow as well?

Again, it is very hard to get a "propiska" for a Russian in Moscow. Most Russians in Moscow are not registered or official residents of Moscow!

It doesn't mention a specific visa type here, but based on other reports, I don't think that Permanent Residence is required. There is good contact info here tho, so one could certainly find out. (see below, the Consulate is also quite vague--it's only by word of mouth that we have the 6 months info)

http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/fieldoffices...htm#anchorlocal

Immediate Relative Immigrant Petitions (Form I-130):

U.S. Citizens residing in our office's jurisdiction may file petitions for immediate relatives at the Moscow office during public hours.

Who May File and When

The Moscow office at the United States Embassy, accepts Form I-130 “Petition for Alien Relative” from United States Citizens who are filing for their spouse, parent, or unmarried child under 21 years of age. Petitions from Lawful Permanent Residents and petitions for relatives other than those mentioned fall into different visa categories and must be filed in the United States. United States Citizens may file their petitions between 2:00 PM and 4:00 PM on Monday through Friday at the immigration intake windows 4 and 5.

(blah blah blah more)

http://moscow.usembassy.gov/consular/consu...ecord_id=ivisas

The Moscow Department of Homeland Security (DHS) office accepts immigrant visa petitions filed only by American citizens resident in Russia on behalf of their relatives any working day between 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. The Immigrant Visa Unit also approves issuance of fiance(e) visas. Fiance(e) visa petitions must be filed with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the United States by the American citizen fiance(e). When the DHS notifies us of the petition approval, we will contact the fiance(e) with instructions on how to prepare for the visa interview.

The applicants should not expect that any information on the documentation submitted by the petitioner to the National Visa Center and received by the Embassy be provided by the Embassy at the applicant's, petitioner's or third party's request prior to the interview.

Please note, that any additional relevant information may be requested at a consular officer's discretion during interview to ensure that a visa is properly issuable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you've been resident in Russia for 6+ months, you can file w/USCIS Field Office there and go straight thru to the Immigrant Visa application.
I wonder how the Embassy in Moscow defines resident? If resident means establishing official Russian residency then that means you have to go through the complicated processes of using a private visa invite and applying for permanent residency in Russia, getting approved 6 months later and re-entering Russia again. I have inquired about this processes as a way to circumvent the expensive business visa invitation, but the processes is so complicated it is not worth doing unless you have no choice. But if 6 months means having a business visa for 6 months then that might be the fastest way to a green card.

Also does your wife have to be a resident of Moscow as well?

Again, it is very hard to get a "propiska" for a Russian in Moscow. Most Russians in Moscow are not registered or official residents of Moscow!

It doesn't mention a specific visa type here, but based on other reports, I don't think that Permanent Residence is required. There is good contact info here tho, so one could certainly find out. (see below, the Consulate is also quite vague--it's only by word of mouth that we have the 6 months info)

http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/fieldoffices...htm#anchorlocal

Immediate Relative Immigrant Petitions (Form I-130):

U.S. Citizens residing in our office's jurisdiction may file petitions for immediate relatives at the Moscow office during public hours.

Who May File and When

The Moscow office at the United States Embassy, accepts Form I-130 “Petition for Alien Relative” from United States Citizens who are filing for their spouse, parent, or unmarried child under 21 years of age. Petitions from Lawful Permanent Residents and petitions for relatives other than those mentioned fall into different visa categories and must be filed in the United States. United States Citizens may file their petitions between 2:00 PM and 4:00 PM on Monday through Friday at the immigration intake windows 4 and 5.

(blah blah blah more)

http://moscow.usembassy.gov/consular/consu...ecord_id=ivisas

The Moscow Department of Homeland Security (DHS) office accepts immigrant visa petitions filed only by American citizens resident in Russia on behalf of their relatives any working day between 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. The Immigrant Visa Unit also approves issuance of fiance(e) visas. Fiance(e) visa petitions must be filed with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the United States by the American citizen fiance(e). When the DHS notifies us of the petition approval, we will contact the fiance(e) with instructions on how to prepare for the visa interview.

The applicants should not expect that any information on the documentation submitted by the petitioner to the National Visa Center and received by the Embassy be provided by the Embassy at the applicant's, petitioner's or third party's request prior to the interview.

Please note, that any additional relevant information may be requested at a consular officer's discretion during interview to ensure that a visa is properly issuable.

So what about obtaining a drivers license in Russia ???

Is that going to be a big hassle for me ??? :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So what about obtaining a drivers license in Russia ???

Is that going to be a big hassle for me ??? :wacko:

When I was there, I translated my California driver's license into Russian and had it notarized by a Russian notary and it was sufficient to drive. However, obtaining a real Russian driver's license will be quite difficult. Mainly because you have to pass the written part in Russian. And you have to pass the driving part using their old manual transmission vehicle. From what I heard it is a much more critical and longer exam that our 5 minute and out test. But I think you can also drive in Russia using those international driver's licenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So what about obtaining a drivers license in Russia ???

Is that going to be a big hassle for me ??? :wacko:

When I was there, I translated my California driver's license into Russian and had it notarized by a Russian notary and it was sufficient to drive. However, obtaining a real Russian driver's license will be quite difficult. Mainly because you have to pass the written part in Russian. And you have to pass the driving part using their old manual transmission vehicle. From what I heard it is a much more critical and longer exam that our 5 minute and out test. But I think you can also drive in Russia using those international driver's licenses.

Was you ever pulled over and checked by the Milita ? That seems to be quite common in Russia..

Also what about Insurance ??? Is it required ??? :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Was you ever pulled over and checked by the Milita ? That seems to be quite common in Russia..

Also what about Insurance ??? Is it required ??? :unsure:

In my two months of driving I was pulled over 4 times for random document checking. I never had to pay fine, because all my documents were in order. Yes, insurance is now required. Insuring my fiancee's family car cost me 1800 rubles for 6 months, which of course is a bargain compared to US rates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×