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SHIAN

after naturalization interview what happens to the old passport?

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Does USCIS take old passport after you pass your naturalization test?

Thanks!

You leave with EVERYTHING you brought in, and that definitely includes your foreign passport. If they want it, they can make a copy of anything you brought in. Also make damn sure you leave with your green card.

You will have to surrender your green card at your oath ceremony. That is when you realize your foreign passport is worthless for either leaving or entering the USA, have to get a US passport. But depending upon your home country, may have to keep that foreign passport current to either enter or leave that country. Department of State calls that dual naturalization, its actually dual citizenship. No foreign country would renew your passport unless you maintain citizenship in that country.

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That is when you realize your foreign passport is worthless for either leaving or entering the USA, have to get a US passport. But depending upon your home country, may have to keep that foreign passport current to either enter or leave that country. Department of State calls that dual naturalization, its actually dual citizenship. No foreign country would renew your passport unless you maintain citizenship in that country.

Unlike some countries (many in Africa) you do not need a US passport to leave the US. You need to show a valid passport of any nation if you are flying out of the US.

Yes you will need a US passport though to enter the US though.

There maybe some weird exceptions, but I don't know of any country that requires you to always use their passport when entering. The US passport should be sufficient. Now there maybe a few expections, I just can't think of any off hand. If you do want to keep another citizenship and it's allowed (some countries don't allow it and you have to give up your former citizenship and passport), then they say it's recommended you use that passport of that nation to enter, but it's not mandatory. I never use my former nations passport to enter. I just always carry my US passport and that is it...

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Warlord,

nothing is unimpossible, but just for the record, a US citizen is required by Federal law not only to enter the United States with his or her US passport, but also to leave it. Let me know if you need a State.gov source for this and I look it up.

OP,

all you take to the Oath Ceremony is your N-445 and your Green Card. Your passport stays home, unless you engaged in international travel between the interview and the Oath Ceremony.

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Warlord,

nothing is unimpossible, but just for the record, a US citizen is required by Federal law not only to enter the United States with his or her US passport, but also to leave it. Let me know if you need a State.gov source for this and I look it up.

OP,

all you take to the Oath Ceremony is your N-445 and your Green Card. Your passport stays home, unless you engaged in international travel between the interview and the Oath Ceremony.

Shain was referring to the naturalized test that could be translated to the interview, not the oath ceremony.

In regards to leaving the USA with a foreign passport, my wife to be was visiting me with a visa and a I-94, on her return trip, always checked and took her I-94 on her return, she was here as a tourist. Since we were engaged to be married, watched that I-94 date like a hawk, didn't want problems with the USCIS with an overstay. We also had problems in renewing her foreign passport, consulate said, why do you want this passport since you are living in the USA. Kind of puts you between a rock and a hard place. Just quickly replied, we are only staying here to make lots of money, then we are both moving back. I told a white lie, but it worked.

Doubt if you would have an I-94 if you lived here for several years as a LPR. When we were married and traveled, that's when she only had her foreign passport and her green card. Her green card was both the key for leaving and coming back. But they take your green card away at the oath ceremony, that is when you need a US passport as well.

If there is a law to do effect, not really aware of it, but if there is, can say by experience, the guys working at the POE are not aware of it.

Wife called the Colombian consulate, was told she should have been admitted to Colombia, not because she was a US Citizen, but because when she was 18 was naturalized in Venezuela that automatically relinquished her Colombian citizenship. But she has no proof of that. So as far as Colombia is concerned, okay to be a US citizen, they will reinstate her, but not a Venezuelan citizen. My head is spinning, but I think she has to relinquish her Venezuelan citizenship first.

At one time, Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador were one country all banding together to get rid of the Spanish control, just like we were getting rid of British control, but we became independent states where they became independent countries. Augmented by the fact that Chavez hates Colombia. So because of his problem, we have problems. Ironically, both countries have the same identical language and cultures, it just that he leadership doesn't get along. So we pay the price, again!

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Shain was referring to the naturalized test that could be translated to the interview, not the oath ceremony.

In regards to leaving the USA with a foreign passport, my wife to be was visiting me with a visa and a I-94, on her return trip, always checked and took her I-94 on her return, she was here as a tourist. Since we were engaged to be married, watched that I-94 date like a hawk, didn't want problems with the USCIS with an overstay. We also had problems in renewing her foreign passport, consulate said, why do you want this passport since you are living in the USA. Kind of puts you between a rock and a hard place. Just quickly replied, we are only staying here to make lots of money, then we are both moving back. I told a white lie, but it worked.

Doubt if you would have an I-94 if you lived here for several years as a LPR. When we were married and traveled, that's when she only had her foreign passport and her green card. Her green card was both the key for leaving and coming back. But they take your green card away at the oath ceremony, that is when you need a US passport as well.

If there is a law to do effect, not really aware of it, but if there is, can say by experience, the guys working at the POE are not aware of it.

Wife called the Colombian consulate, was told she should have been admitted to Colombia, not because she was a US Citizen, but because when she was 18 was naturalized in Venezuela that automatically relinquished her Colombian citizenship. But she has no proof of that. So as far as Colombia is concerned, okay to be a US citizen, they will reinstate her, but not a Venezuelan citizen. My head is spinning, but I think she has to relinquish her Venezuelan citizenship first.

At one time, Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador were one country all banding together to get rid of the Spanish control, just like we were getting rid of British control, but we became independent states where they became independent countries. Augmented by the fact that Chavez hates Colombia. So because of his problem, we have problems. Ironically, both countries have the same identical language and cultures, it just that he leadership doesn't get along. So we pay the price, again!

so i guess your wife can't be called American/ Venezuela/Colombian citizen anytime soon then huh :blink:

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