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yellow123

2 yrs 9 months or 3 years

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Hi, my wife's friends were able to apply for Naturalization after only 2 years and 9 months upon recieving thier permanent resident card. They all are married to a US citizen. Is this still true for 2011 or has there been a rule changed ? I can't find any information regarding this on the USCIS website. Any help is much appreciated. Thanks.

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Hi, my wife's friends were able to apply for Naturalization after only 2 years and 9 months upon recieving thier permanent resident card. They all are married to a US citizen. Is this still true for 2011 or has there been a rule changed ? I can't find any information regarding this on the USCIS website. Any help is much appreciated. Thanks.

O^ng,

Go to this link. and search for citizenship. the rule is one can apply for earlier of 2.9 years married to usc or 5 years continous residence withou married to usc - the date one become permanent residence(located on green card).

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis

Edited by Journey05

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O^ng,

Go to this link. and search for citizenship. the rule is one can apply for earlier of 2.9 years married to usc or 5 years continous residence withou married to usc - the date one become permanent residence(located on green card).

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis

Can start filing within 90 days prior to 3 years if continiously to same US citizen and 90 days prior to 5 years if not.

90 days is NOT 3 months, it tends to be a little less that 3 months.

2.9 years implies 2 year 11 months, to be more accurate it would be 2.75 years not 2.9.

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90 days is NOT 3 months, it tends to be a little less that 3 months.

This is actually very important for those that file right away and get denied because they filed exactly 3 months before rather then 90 days. There are many cases of people doing this and having the N-400 returned and thus delaying them further...

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You can file 90 days before you meet the length-of-permanent-residency requirements (3 years for the spouse of a USC), BUT, and this is a separate requirement, you need to have been married for 3 full years at the time of filing.

For a lot of K-1ers, this distinction is irrelevant. If you got your GC more than 90 days after you got married, then you will have been married for 3 full years at the 90-days-prior-to-3-years-of-permanent-residency mark.

But if you got your GC within 90s of your wedding, as I [and an increasing number of people] did, then you can't file until you've been married 3 full years.

It's a little tricky.

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USCIS has been nice enough to add many downloads in terms of eligibility worksheets and required evidence. All here.

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.5af9bb95919f35e66f614176543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=480ccac09aa5d010VgnVCM10000048f3d6a1RCRD&vgnextchannel=db029c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1RCRD

What is a bit nebulous is counting the anniversary date of your green card, or the day before it. Better to figure on using 88 days rather than 90 and even waiting an extra day or two extra then having your application returned. Really a stupid thing to be critical on, but again you are dealing with the USCIS. Just like being rejected if you show up 30 seconds late for an appointment, but after you get in, we had to wait as long as 3 1/2 hours before being seen. Or having a child rejected because that child barely turned over 18, even though you can show them those delays were caused by them. But we lucked out on the I-751 because I had a good attorney pounding on their door when they misplaced her application for her conditional green card. Was 63 days later, but met some that had the same experience with slightly over 90 days, so they had to file a separate I-751 and pay the extra fees due to a no-fault making USCIS.

Really not complaining, just telling it the way it is.

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