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Steffi

Atlanta Naturalization Interview & Oath Ceremony

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My naturalization interview appointment was scheduled for 10:05am on Tuesday, February 9. Hubby and I arrived at around 9:35am and then took about 10 minutes to get through the security line and check-in on the second floor, leaving about 20 minutes until interview time. Unfortunately they were running behind and I was not called in until 11:05am or so. (Significant others stay in the waiting room.) The lady took me back to her office where she told me to sit down. The next 5 minutes were an awkward silence while she sorted through paperwork. She then asked me to stand, raise my right hand, and I had to swear that I would state the truth, and then sat back down. I can’t remember the precise order of events throughout the interview so don’t quote me on this exact order, but she asked me about some personal information, such as saying my full name, birth date, address, phone number, social security number, etc. She printed out a piece of paper to verify that this information all looked correct. She also asked if I was married to a citizen and what I do for a living. I was asked the questions that were also asked on the N-400 form – were you ever arrested, are you in the process of being deported, are you a member of the communist party, do you understand the Oath, are you willing to fight for the country, etc. She didn’t ask me for any supporting documentation that I was asked to bring in a “Interview Document Check List” letter I had received. (So much for all that wasted photocopied paper, but better safe than sorry!) She then informed me the civics test would start. Unfortunately I can only recall four of the questions I was asked:

1) What does the President’s Cabinet do?

2) How many justices are on the Supreme Court?

3) If both the President and the Vice President can no longer serve, who becomes President?

4) Name one branch or part of the government.

She had me read one sentence to do with Columbus Day (can’t precisely remember what) and then I had to write the sentence “Columbus Day is in October.” I was then asked if I would like to take the Oath the same day. I told her I would love to. She then gave me a letter I had to sign and handed me another letter to say I had passed the exam. She informed me the paperwork would need to be handed over to someone to verify that everything looked in order, and if it did my name would be called to tell me I was good to attend the Oath ceremony.

I was back out in the waiting room by 11:25, so I would estimate the interview took about 15 minutes. My name was finally called at 1:10pm and I was handed the paper that told me to come back at 2:00pm for the Oath ceremony.

Hubby and I quickly drove to the adjacent Northlake Mall to grab some Chinese food and silence our growling stomachs. Then we hurried back. The security line behind us was growing very quickly because obviously many people came for the same 2:00pm Oath Ceremony. I was asked to sit out in front of the Oath room along with my fellow citizens-to-be. Hubby was asked to sit further back, and in some cases people were told to go up to the third floor because the waiting room was getting too crowded. They checked us in by the row, and it wasn’t until close to 3:00pm that all 187 immigrants were sitting in the room ready to take their Oath. At that point family was told to come in. A woman (head of the Atlanta office?) gave a speech and also informed family members they could photograph the ceremony. She then called out every country represented and you were supposed to stand up when your country was called. When everyone was standing we had to repeat the Oath after her (a booklet on your seat has a copy of it) and then we were citizens!! We were shown a video of President Obama welcoming us as new citizens and then a music video of “Proud to be an American”. Then family members were asked to go wait outside, and the woman told us the info packet on our seats included information about next steps like passport, updating social security cards, and registering to vote. We were then called in rows and handed our Naturalization Certificates as we exited!

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My naturalization interview appointment was scheduled for 10:05am on Tuesday, February 9. Hubby and I arrived at around 9:35am and then took about 10 minutes to get through the security line and check-in on the second floor, leaving about 20 minutes until interview time. Unfortunately they were running behind and I was not called in until 11:05am or so. (Significant others stay in the waiting room.) The lady took me back to her office where she told me to sit down. The next 5 minutes were an awkward silence while she sorted through paperwork. She then asked me to stand, raise my right hand, and I had to swear that I would state the truth, and then sat back down. I can’t remember the precise order of events throughout the interview so don’t quote me on this exact order, but she asked me about some personal information, such as saying my full name, birth date, address, phone number, social security number, etc. She printed out a piece of paper to verify that this information all looked correct. She also asked if I was married to a citizen and what I do for a living. I was asked the questions that were also asked on the N-400 form – were you ever arrested, are you in the process of being deported, are you a member of the communist party, do you understand the Oath, are you willing to fight for the country, etc. She didn’t ask me for any supporting documentation that I was asked to bring in a “Interview Document Check List” letter I had received. (So much for all that wasted photocopied paper, but better safe than sorry!) She then informed me the civics test would start. Unfortunately I can only recall four of the questions I was asked:

1) What does the President’s Cabinet do?

2) How many justices are on the Supreme Court?

3) If both the President and the Vice President can no longer serve, who becomes President?

4) Name one branch or part of the government.

She had me read one sentence to do with Columbus Day (can’t precisely remember what) and then I had to write the sentence “Columbus Day is in October.” I was then asked if I would like to take the Oath the same day. I told her I would love to. She then gave me a letter I had to sign and handed me another letter to say I had passed the exam. She informed me the paperwork would need to be handed over to someone to verify that everything looked in order, and if it did my name would be called to tell me I was good to attend the Oath ceremony.

I was back out in the waiting room by 11:25, so I would estimate the interview took about 15 minutes. My name was finally called at 1:10pm and I was handed the paper that told me to come back at 2:00pm for the Oath ceremony.

Hubby and I quickly drove to the adjacent Northlake Mall to grab some Chinese food and silence our growling stomachs. Then we hurried back. The security line behind us was growing very quickly because obviously many people came for the same 2:00pm Oath Ceremony. I was asked to sit out in front of the Oath room along with my fellow citizens-to-be. Hubby was asked to sit further back, and in some cases people were told to go up to the third floor because the waiting room was getting too crowded. They checked us in by the row, and it wasn’t until close to 3:00pm that all 187 immigrants were sitting in the room ready to take their Oath. At that point family was told to come in. A woman (head of the Atlanta office?) gave a speech and also informed family members they could photograph the ceremony. She then called out every country represented and you were supposed to stand up when your country was called. When everyone was standing we had to repeat the Oath after her (a booklet on your seat has a copy of it) and then we were citizens!! We were shown a video of President Obama welcoming us as new citizens and then a music video of “Proud to be an American”. Then family members were asked to go wait outside, and the woman told us the info packet on our seats included information about next steps like passport, updating social security cards, and registering to vote. We were then called in rows and handed our Naturalization Certificates as we exited!

Congratulations!

thanks for sharing your experience.

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Congratulations! It's good to know that they will do the same day oath ceremony for interviews as late as 11 as well . Your interview and ceremony sound very similar to mine - but it was in Atlanta too! Great photos!

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Hi Steffi,

Congratulations on passing your interview and congrats on having the same day oath ceremony!... :star:

Thanks too, for sharing your detailed experience and for providing photos of such an experience! :thumbs:

Good luck with the rest of your journey as a US Citizen and good luck in getting your passport too.

Ant

P.S. If you don't mind me asking, how did you upload and share your photos on VJ? Did you use photobucket or something else?

My naturalization interview appointment was scheduled for 10:05am on Tuesday, February 9. Hubby and I arrived at around 9:35am and then took about 10 minutes to get through the security line and check-in on the second floor, leaving about 20 minutes until interview time. Unfortunately they were running behind and I was not called in until 11:05am or so. (Significant others stay in the waiting room.) The lady took me back to her office where she told me to sit down. The next 5 minutes were an awkward silence while she sorted through paperwork. She then asked me to stand, raise my right hand, and I had to swear that I would state the truth, and then sat back down. I can’t remember the precise order of events throughout the interview so don’t quote me on this exact order, but she asked me about some personal information, such as saying my full name, birth date, address, phone number, social security number, etc. She printed out a piece of paper to verify that this information all looked correct. She also asked if I was married to a citizen and what I do for a living. I was asked the questions that were also asked on the N-400 form – were you ever arrested, are you in the process of being deported, are you a member of the communist party, do you understand the Oath, are you willing to fight for the country, etc. She didn’t ask me for any supporting documentation that I was asked to bring in a “Interview Document Check List” letter I had received. (So much for all that wasted photocopied paper, but better safe than sorry!) She then informed me the civics test would start. Unfortunately I can only recall four of the questions I was asked:

1) What does the President’s Cabinet do?

2) How many justices are on the Supreme Court?

3) If both the President and the Vice President can no longer serve, who becomes President?

4) Name one branch or part of the government.

She had me read one sentence to do with Columbus Day (can’t precisely remember what) and then I had to write the sentence “Columbus Day is in October.” I was then asked if I would like to take the Oath the same day. I told her I would love to. She then gave me a letter I had to sign and handed me another letter to say I had passed the exam. She informed me the paperwork would need to be handed over to someone to verify that everything looked in order, and if it did my name would be called to tell me I was good to attend the Oath ceremony.

I was back out in the waiting room by 11:25, so I would estimate the interview took about 15 minutes. My name was finally called at 1:10pm and I was handed the paper that told me to come back at 2:00pm for the Oath ceremony.

Hubby and I quickly drove to the adjacent Northlake Mall to grab some Chinese food and silence our growling stomachs. Then we hurried back. The security line behind us was growing very quickly because obviously many people came for the same 2:00pm Oath Ceremony. I was asked to sit out in front of the Oath room along with my fellow citizens-to-be. Hubby was asked to sit further back, and in some cases people were told to go up to the third floor because the waiting room was getting too crowded. They checked us in by the row, and it wasn’t until close to 3:00pm that all 187 immigrants were sitting in the room ready to take their Oath. At that point family was told to come in. A woman (head of the Atlanta office?) gave a speech and also informed family members they could photograph the ceremony. She then called out every country represented and you were supposed to stand up when your country was called. When everyone was standing we had to repeat the Oath after her (a booklet on your seat has a copy of it) and then we were citizens!! We were shown a video of President Obama welcoming us as new citizens and then a music video of “Proud to be an American”. Then family members were asked to go wait outside, and the woman told us the info packet on our seats included information about next steps like passport, updating social security cards, and registering to vote. We were then called in rows and handed our Naturalization Certificates as we exited!

Edited by Ant+D+BabyA

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