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champi

Citizenship test in different language?

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Hello everyone,

I was hoping to get some help from you guys since I can't find the answer anywhere else. We were told by a relative few weeks back that a person can take the citizenship tests in language other than English. I've not read this anywhere in my Google search. I know that if a person is over 55 and have been a green card holder for 15 years then they're not required to take English test. But I think they still have to take the civic test and that too in English language, correct?

We're looking to see if my mom can study and take test in one of the Indian languages such as Hindi.

Thanks for your help.

Edited by champi

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Hi Champi,

Here is what the USCIS says about accomodations and exemptions:

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Exceptions & Accommodations

There are exceptions and modifications to the naturalization requirements that are available to those who qualify. USCIS also provides accommodations for individuals with disabilities.

See the “A Guide to Naturalization” link to the right for more information.

English Language Exemptions

You Are Exempt From The English Language Requirement, But Are Still Required To Take The Civics Test If You Are:

Age 50 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and have lived as a permanent resident (green card holder) in the United States for 20 years (commonly referred to as the “50/20” exception).

OR

Age 55 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and have lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 15 years (commonly referred to as the “55/15” exception).

Note: Even if you qualify for the “50/20” or “55/15” English language exceptions listed above, you must still take the civics test. You may be permitted to take the civics test in your native language, but only if your command of spoken English is insufficient to conduct a valid examination in English. If you are age 65 or older and have been a permanent resident for at least 20 years at the time of filing for naturalization, you will be given special consideration regarding the civics requirement.

Medical Disability Exceptions to English and Civics

You may be eligible for an exception to the English and civics naturalization requirements if you are unable to comply with these requirements because of a physical or developmental disability or a mental impairment.

To request this exception, submit Form N-648, Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions. This form must be completed by a licensed medical or osteopathic doctor, or licensed clinical psychologist.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The test consists of 10 history/civics questions that the immigration officer asks verbally and the applicant answers verbally, to see if the applicant knows enough about US history, which the applicant has to get at least 6 right from that. And the test also consists of 2 sentences, to see if one the applicant is able to understand English. One sentence is a sentence that the applicant reads out loud from a written statement. The other sentence is one that the immigration officer says out loud, and the applicant has to write such down. As well, the immigration officer will go through her application form, and ask additional question about her application and other things, if need be.

For more information about the test materials, you can read more about that here:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Naturalization Test

One of the requirements for U.S. citizenship through naturalization is to take the naturalization test to demonstrate that you are able to read, write, and speak basic English and that you have a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government (also known as “civics”).

Once you have completed and submitted your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, and you have had your fingerprints taken at a USCIS facility, you will receive an appointment for an interview. At your naturalization interview, you will be required to answer questions about your application and background. You will also take an English and civics test unless you qualify for an exemption or waiver.

English & Civics

During your interview, a USCIS officer will test your ability to read, write, and speak English and your knowledge of civics. You must read one sentence out of three sentences correctly in English, and you must write one sentence out of three sentences correctly in English. Your ability to speak English is determined during your interview on your naturalization application. Finally, you must answer 6 out of 10 civics questions correctly to achieve a passing score.

You will be given two opportunities to take the English and civics tests and to answer all questions relating to your naturalization application in English. If you fail any of the tests at your initial interview, you will be retested on the portion of the test that you failed (English or civics) between 60 and 90 days from the date of your initial interview. See 8 CFR 312.5(a) and 335.3(.

If You Don’t Pass

If an applicant fails the English and/or civics test during the first examination, the applicant will be required to take the same version of the test, old or new, when the applicant is retested, even if the retest is scheduled on or after October 1, 2009.

Study Materials for the Naturalization Test

During your naturalization eligibility interview, a USCIS officer will test your ability to read, write, and speak English (unless you are exempt from the English requirements). You will also be given a civics test in English (to test your knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government) unless you are exempt. Even if exempt from the English test, you will need to take the civics test unless you qualify for a waiver. You may also be eligible to take the civics test in your native language with the assistance of an interpreter if you qualify.

See the “Exceptions & Accommodations” link to the right for more information.

English. Your English skills will be tested in the following ways:

Reading. To test your ability to read in English, you must read one sentence, out of three sentences, in a manner suggesting to the USCIS officer that you understand the meaning of the sentence.

Writing. To test your ability to write in English, you must write one sentence, out of three sentences, in a manner that would be understandable as written to the USCIS officer.

Speaking. Your ability to speak English is determined by your answers to questions normally asked by USCIS officers during the naturalization eligibility interview regarding the information on your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization.

Civics. During your interview, the USCIS officer will ask you to orally answer a set of civics questions. You must answer 6 out of 10 civics questions correctly to achieve a passing score.

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Hope this helps. Good luck with you and your mom's immigration journey too.

Ant

Hello everyone,

I was hoping to get some help from you guys since I can't find the answer anywhere else. We were told by a relative few weeks back that a person can take the citizenship tests in language other than English. I've not read this anywhere in my Google search. I know that if a person is over 55 and have been a green card holder for 15 years then they're not required to take English test. But I think they still have to take the civic test and that too in English language, correct?

We're looking to see if my mom can study and take test in one of the Indian languages such as Hindi.

Thanks for your help.

Edited by Ant+D+A

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I don't know the answer for certain but I've got to believe it would be an english-only kind of thing.

"One of the requirements for U.S. citizenship through naturalization is to take the naturalization test to demonstrate that you are able to read, write, and speak basic English" source

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Hello everyone,

I was hoping to get some help from you guys since I can't find the answer anywhere else. We were told by a relative few weeks back that a person can take the citizenship tests in language other than English. I've not read this anywhere in my Google search. I know that if a person is over 55 and have been a green card holder for 15 years then they're not required to take English test. But I think they still have to take the civic test and that too in English language, correct?

We're looking to see if my mom can study and take test in one of the Indian languages such as Hindi.

Thanks for your help.

Well if a person is applying to become a citizen of this (or any other) country and has lived over 15 years in the same country, it's a common sense that it will be able to speak and understand the language of the country he/she desires to be a citizen of.

So the answer is NO - whoever wants to become a US citizen must at least understand the language.

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Hello everyone,

I was hoping to get some help from you guys since I can't find the answer anywhere else. We were told by a relative few weeks back that a person can take the citizenship tests in language other than English. I've not read this anywhere in my Google search. I know that if a person is over 55 and have been a green card holder for 15 years then they're not required to take English test. But I think they still have to take the civic test and that too in English language, correct?

We're looking to see if my mom can study and take test in one of the Indian languages such as Hindi.

Thanks for your help.

Well if a person is applying to become a citizen of this (or any other) country and has lived over 15 years in the same country, it's a common sense that it will be able to speak and understand the language of the country he/she desires to be a citizen of.

So the answer is NO - whoever wants to become a US citizen must at least understand the language.

:thumbs: :thumbs:

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Hello everyone,

I was hoping to get some help from you guys since I can't find the answer anywhere else. We were told by a relative few weeks back that a person can take the citizenship tests in language other than English. I've not read this anywhere in my Google search. I know that if a person is over 55 and have been a green card holder for 15 years then they're not required to take English test. But I think they still have to take the civic test and that too in English language, correct?

We're looking to see if my mom can study and take test in one of the Indian languages such as Hindi.

Thanks for your help.

Well if a person is applying to become a citizen of this (or any other) country and has lived over 15 years in the same country, it's a common sense that it will be able to speak and understand the language of the country he/she desires to be a citizen of.

So the answer is NO - whoever wants to become a US citizen must at least understand the language.

It might be common sense, but if you read the detailed rules posted by Ant+D+A you will see that it is not true. In particular:

You Are Exempt From The English Language Requirement, But Are Still Required To Take The Civics Test If You Are:

Age 50 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and have lived as a permanent resident (green card holder) in the United States for 20 years (commonly referred to as the “50/20” exception).

OR

Age 55 or older at the time of filing for naturalization and have lived as a permanent resident in the United States for 15 years (commonly referred to as the “55/15” exception).

Note: Even if you qualify for the “50/20” or “55/15” English language exceptions listed above, you must still take the civics test. You may be permitted to take the civics test in your native language, but only if your command of spoken English is insufficient to conduct a valid examination in English. If you are age 65 or older and have been a permanent resident for at least 20 years at the time of filing for naturalization, you will be given special consideration regarding the civics requirement.

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