Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Kittyfang

What kind of translation does USCIS require?

20 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

This is taken from I-130 and I-485 instructions:

Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

There ARE certified translator. They belong to an association and are legally allowed to certify translated documents. However, recently, someone said something about translated document and about how a certified translator was not needed. This got me thinking and, from this description, this is what I understand:

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct. Now, are they talking about, for example, me translating a document, then getting it notarized? Seems strange. The notary wouldn't really know if the translation is real or not.

... and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. Again, an example. I am competent to do that. I don't belong to a translator association, but I have been a translator in the past.

I may just be confused, but what exactly do they mean?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is taken from I-130 and I-485 instructions:

Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

There ARE certified translator. They belong to an association and are legally allowed to certify translated documents. However, recently, someone said something about translated document and about how a certified translator was not needed. This got me thinking and, from this description, this is what I understand:

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct. Now, are they talking about, for example, me translating a document, then getting it notarized? Seems strange. The notary wouldn't really know if the translation is real or not.

... and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. Again, an example. I am competent to do that. I don't belong to a translator association, but I have been a translator in the past.

I may just be confused, but what exactly do they mean?

See this example below.

Additionaly notories do not certify any information in any document to be correct. They simply acknowledge that signature on the document to be that of the person that signed.

The certification format should include the certifier's name, signature, address, and date of certification. A suggested format is:

Certification by Translator

I [typed name], certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and ________ languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled ______________________________.

Signature_________________________________

Date Typed Name

Address

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you certify that you are competent in both languages, then you can translate the document yourself. Just have it notarized so they know that it was you who signed the document.

I translated my stepson's documents from spanish to english. We had looked into getting it translated by another, but they wanted to charge $20 per sheet. I think we had four sheets, so I decided to save the money and do it myself. The I-130 was recently approved with no problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is taken from I-130 and I-485 instructions:

Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

There ARE certified translator. They belong to an association and are legally allowed to certify translated documents. However, recently, someone said something about translated document and about how a certified translator was not needed. This got me thinking and, from this description, this is what I understand:

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct. Now, are they talking about, for example, me translating a document, then getting it notarized? Seems strange. The notary wouldn't really know if the translation is real or not.

... and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. Again, an example. I am competent to do that. I don't belong to a translator association, but I have been a translator in the past.

I may just be confused, but what exactly do they mean?

See this example below.

Additionaly notories do not certify any information in any document to be correct. They simply acknowledge that signature on the document to be that of the person that signed.

The certification format should include the certifier's name, signature, address, and date of certification. A suggested format is:

Certification by Translator

I [typed name], certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and ________ languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled ______________________________.

Signature_________________________________

Date Typed Name

Address

I see, but, can you get any translator to do that? Or do they have to be recognized by some sort of association?

If you certify that you are competent in both languages, then you can translate the document yourself. Just have it notarized so they know that it was you who signed the document.

I translated my stepson's documents from spanish to english. We had looked into getting it translated by another, but they wanted to charge $20 per sheet. I think we had four sheets, so I decided to save the money and do it myself. The I-130 was recently approved with no problems.

That is good to hear. Translation is what I do, when I'm allowed to work. So it was bothering me to have to pay someone else to do it. :thumbs:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I translated my own documents and didn't even notarize them. I had full command over both languages so didn't feel a need to seek a registered translator. Unless asked specifically, you don't need to notarize them. Good if you can. More authentic that way. My documents were accepted. I-130 already approved and I-485 on the verge of a hopeful decision. Edited by saspk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I translated my own documents and didn't even notarize them. I had full command over both languages so didn't feel a need to seek a registered translator. Unless asked specifically, you don't need to notarize them. Good if you can. More authentic that way. My documents were accepted. I-130 already approved and I-485 on the verge of a hopeful decision.

I am glad to hear that. I remember calling the misinformation hot line and was told that I needed a certified translator... Then again, these people know less about immigration than most VJers. :devil:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a friend who helped me in this matter.

I did the translation myself and then I had her certify that she did the translation and that is fluent in both languages and that the translation matches the original. I didn't want her waste her time with the translation.

ps: You don't need a "certified/authorized translator"!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Translate everything on a separate sheet of paper.

Try to make the translation look like the original. Per example : title in the middle, where the original has capital letters, use the same format in the translation...If you have a table with columns try to create those columns in the translation as well...you know what I mean, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Translate everything on a separate sheet of paper.

Try to make the translation look like the original. Per example : title in the middle, where the original has capital letters, use the same format in the translation...If you have a table with columns try to create those columns in the translation as well...you know what I mean, right?

Yup. Thank you very much! :thumbs:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is taken from I-130 and I-485 instructions:

Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

There ARE certified translator. They belong to an association and are legally allowed to certify translated documents. However, recently, someone said something about translated document and about how a certified translator was not needed. This got me thinking and, from this description, this is what I understand:

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct. Now, are they talking about, for example, me translating a document, then getting it notarized? Seems strange. The notary wouldn't really know if the translation is real or not.

... and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. Again, an example. I am competent to do that. I don't belong to a translator association, but I have been a translator in the past.

I may just be confused, but what exactly do they mean?

You are just confusing the word 'certified' in the sentence.

They never state that the person translating has to be certified.

They state they want the document to be signed - by whomever translates it - indicating that they certify it to be a correct translation.

Nothing to do with a notary or translators that belong to any association.

Edited by trailmix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is taken from I-130 and I-485 instructions:

Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

There ARE certified translator. They belong to an association and are legally allowed to certify translated documents. However, recently, someone said something about translated document and about how a certified translator was not needed. This got me thinking and, from this description, this is what I understand:

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct. Now, are they talking about, for example, me translating a document, then getting it notarized? Seems strange. The notary wouldn't really know if the translation is real or not.

... and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. Again, an example. I am competent to do that. I don't belong to a translator association, but I have been a translator in the past.

I may just be confused, but what exactly do they mean?

You are just confusing the word 'certified' in the sentence.

They never state that the person translating has to be certified.

They state they want the document to be signed - by whomever translates it - indicating that they certify it to be a correct translation.

Nothing to do with a notary or translators that belong to any association.

That's awesome! Thank you for confirming. So, just to make sure, USCIS doesn't mind having the beneficiary translate everything?

Like I said, I hate spending money on something I can do myself. :thumbs:

Edited by Kittyfang

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I translated all our documents that needed translating. And I certified them, using the model language on the USCIS site that's already been quoted on this thread. I have no formal language credentials, but enough fluency to do the job. Nothing was notarized. It worked just fine.

Something like a birth certificate usually doesn't have a whole lot of language on it that's subject to subtle re-interpretation, with shades of meaning and connotations involved, so the translation is generally pretty straightforward. If you're translating something that may seem a bit controversial and you want to avoid the appearance of conflict of interest, go ahead and hire a neutral third party to do the translation and certify it. But if you're confident in your ability and you want to save money and time, do it yourself. Be sure that you're comfortable with the possibility that the USCIS might get their own language expert to look at your translation (not that they will, but they could). If their language expert found you had distorted the meaning in a significant way, it would spell serious trouble for your case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I translated all our documents that needed translating. And I certified them, using the model language on the USCIS site that's already been quoted on this thread. I have no formal language credentials, but enough fluency to do the job. Nothing was notarized. It worked just fine.

Something like a birth certificate usually doesn't have a whole lot of language on it that's subject to subtle re-interpretation, with shades of meaning and connotations involved, so the translation is generally pretty straightforward. If you're translating something that may seem a bit controversial and you want to avoid the appearance of conflict of interest, go ahead and hire a neutral third party to do the translation and certify it. But if you're confident in your ability and you want to save money and time, do it yourself. Be sure that you're comfortable with the possibility that the USCIS might get their own language expert to look at your translation (not that they will, but they could). If their language expert found you had distorted the meaning in a significant way, it would spell serious trouble for your case.

That is good to know! I agree with the birth certificate translation, it's pretty straight forward.

I will have some letters from family member, I will translate those as well and hope for the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is taken from I-130 and I-485 instructions:

Translations. Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct, and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English.

There ARE certified translator. They belong to an association and are legally allowed to certify translated documents. However, recently, someone said something about translated document and about how a certified translator was not needed. This got me thinking and, from this description, this is what I understand:

Any foreign language document must be accompanied by a full English translation that the translator has certified as complete and correct. Now, are they talking about, for example, me translating a document, then getting it notarized? Seems strange. The notary wouldn't really know if the translation is real or not.

... and by the translator's certification that he or she is competent to translate the foreign language into English. Again, an example. I am competent to do that. I don't belong to a translator association, but I have been a translator in the past.

I may just be confused, but what exactly do they mean?

See this example below.

Additionaly notories do not certify any information in any document to be correct. They simply acknowledge that signature on the document to be that of the person that signed.

The certification format should include the certifier's name, signature, address, and date of certification. A suggested format is:

Certification by Translator

I [typed name], certify that I am fluent (conversant) in the English and ________ languages, and that the above/attached document is an accurate translation of the document attached entitled ______________________________.

Signature_________________________________

Date Typed Name

Address

I see, but, can you get any translator to do that? Or do they have to be recognized by some sort of association?

If you certify that you are competent in both languages, then you can translate the document yourself. Just have it notarized so they know that it was you who signed the document.

I translated my stepson's documents from spanish to english. We had looked into getting it translated by another, but they wanted to charge $20 per sheet. I think we had four sheets, so I decided to save the money and do it myself. The I-130 was recently approved with no problems.

That is good to hear. Translation is what I do, when I'm allowed to work. So it was bothering me to have to pay someone else to do it. :thumbs:

The example form is self explanitory. It is the certification required. Fill in the blanks & thats it. This has been used by many here on V J with no problems.

There is no requirement to be a translator or use one for this purpose. The requirement is that the person doing the translation is fluent in the language needing translation.

There is no need to notarize the documents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Back to Top ↑

Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Try asking our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×